Laminate flooring install

Preparing to install laminate flooring in my bedroom this weekend, I lifted up some of the carpet to see how close to the concrete slab floor the bottom of the moulding is, and the bottom of the moulding is almost right down to the slab - I was hoping to have enough clearance under the bottom of the moulding to slide the laminate under the moulding and avoid having to remove and then reinstall the moulding. Being lazy and liking shortcuts, I gotta ask - after I get the carpet, padding, and tackstrips up, what'd be wrong with leaving the existing moulding where it is (it looks fine and there's a really nice caulk job between the top of the moulding and the sheetrock wall) and just using a piece of quarter round moulding attached to the existing moulding to cover the expansion gap between the laminate and the moulding?
What's the "best" choice on the correct color for the quarter round - white to match the wall, or a stain that approximates the flooring?
Thanks!
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Texas Yankee wrote: Preparing to install laminate flooring in my bedroom this weekend,... Being lazy and liking shortcuts, I gotta ask - after I get the carpet, padding, and tackstrips up, what'd be wrong with leaving the existing moulding where it is (it looks fine and there's a really nice caulk job between the top of the moulding and the sheetrock wall) and just using a piece of quarter round moulding attached to the existing moulding to cover the expansion gap between the laminate and the moulding?
Nothing, except I would use shoe molding instead of 1/4 round.
What's the "best" choice on the correct color for the quarter round - white to match the wall, or a stain that approximates the flooring?
Depends on what you like, I would paint it to match the base molding.
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wrote:

Nothing, this is how many people do it. However, given the chance to do it again I would have removed the baseboard. I think it looks better and cleaner that way. It also eliminates the chance of a gap due to the quarter-round not being wide enough.

I would choose the same color as the floor, but it is all your taste.
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I sure hope you have read the installation instructions. Sounds like you are winging it. You need a moisture barrier and there are other issues...

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"winging it" ? Well, I'm not a professional, but I think I can handle it - I already have the moisture barrier - I purchased it when I purchased the flooring - and the install instructions seem pretty straightforward - oriented to a do-it-yourselfer versus a professional - the laminate and moisture barrier was only a few hundred (small room) - worst case, I screw it up and I get a pro in to do it after I do the prep - best case, the job goes fine and the other three bedrooms are a lot easier for me.
Thanks for the help everyone!

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Just in case you don' tknow already. Use a CARBIDE blade for cutting. This is tough stuff and ruins a steel blade very fast.
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Caulk? Why is caulk needed? . You can leave it if you desire. If you remove it, refinish it, and then put it back (it will be a little higher over the floor) the job will look first rate.

I'd match the existing trim. It is part of hte trim, not part of the floor.
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I would guess that 90% of the laminate and other floating floors are done this way. It is the same method that I used for my floating hardwood floor. Also, I used a plain painted quarter round. I think it looks better and is certainly cheaper than stained wood or wood look alike.
Darrell
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the bottom of the moulding is almost right down to

by the way... there is a special type of saw that can be used to undercut the moulding flush with the wall. it is designed specially for your specific problem. You might be able to rent one if it's not in the budget. I like your solution but just wanted to say.... here is a link to the type of saw I mean:
http://www.craintools.com/specialtysaw.htm
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On 20 Jun 2006 19:51:12 -0700, Lawrence wrote:

How do you plan on getting it under the base ?....If it is a snap-loc laminate which most are the plank will have to be at around 45 deg. to interlock...never get it under both baseboards
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Peter Griffin wrote:

The saw does exist, however, which is the only point I am making. I am not an expert in the field but here is one idea: The flooring can be fit under the baseboard on one side of the room. Then, when you get to the other side of the room you could rip the edge off of the last plank then slide it under the other baseboard. The baseboard would hold it in place and it would also be face nailed. There are probably other ways. I like the OP's solution and have previously said so. I just wanted to point out the neat tool which is apparently designed specifically for this problem.
Lawrence
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Lawrence wrote:

I install laminate flooring I am located in Moorhead, MN There are a couple different ways to solve your moulding issues. You can but up to the existing baseboard (leaving a 1/4" gap or manufacturers recommended space of course) and then put quarter round on OR you can take out the baseboard and reinstall it. If you take out the base board in a room and it 45's with another piece of baseboard that is not going to be over the laminate be forewarned you will have to cut 5/16 or so off the bottom of the baseboard so that the heights of the mouldings come into check. Laminate is a job that takes a little know how and a little experience working with it a time or two. The stores make it look really easy! I think there is something to remember not discounting anyones ability. You get what you pay for!
If you have any questions or are around Fargo Moorhead and need someone to install laminate for you drop me a line I am more than willing to help! James ~ Paragon Renovations ~ Moorhead, MN ~ paragon snipped-for-privacy@msn.com
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