laminate flooring

Just wondering how difficult it is to install Pergo or other laminate flooring. I'm moving into a condo that has w/w broadloom with a fairly long pile. I don't like it and have been debating ripping it up. I will check with the board to make sure that it's permissible, but have heard that it's allowed in this building.
I've been reading up on installing this stuff and it doesn't seem too difficult.
One of the problems may be the baseboard. I think it's too low and might have to be raised, which might be a pain. Alternatively I may be able to just add some 1/4 round to it to mask the gap at the wall.
I'm also planning on installing ceramic tile in the bathrooms, utility room and kitchen so I will have to sort out the height difference and install the appropriate molding at the joint, which seems to depend upon the height difference. I'm thinking that I would have to have a sample of each and put them side by side to determine which would be higher and plan accordingly. They may be fairly close as I'm thinking of fairly large tiles and I would have to have a cushion under the flooring.
I'm also debating going with the laminate right into the bathrooms and kitchen. The manufacturers seem to agree that it's ok to do this as long as you seal the edges to make sure that no water gets under the floor. It seems to me that going into a small room like that might present a few challenges such as. What if you want to change the direction of the flooring when you enter the room? How would you handle that joint and would it look odd? What about some sort of stoop of some other material to break up the flow?
Any thoughts or suggestions welcome.
tia
Peter H
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You need just a few tools. A saw wit a carbide blade, of course. It is tough stuff to cut. Miter saw is best. If you can borrow one, a blade is about $50, you can buy a cheapo saw for $99 at Home Depot. You'll need a blade anyway.

I removed the baseboard and put it back after the floor was installed. Just adding the 1/4 round is a hack way of doing it.

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You can do that after intallation. All sorts of transition strips are available. Or you can modify one.

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You can use the same transition strips as any other rom would be. The laminate company will have then or you can buy generic onces. Ed
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Take the base board off the wall completely, do your install this will assure that you have more than adequate gap for expansion, than re-install the baseboard and 1/4 rd.
Tom

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1. If it's a condo, you need no permission for any interior changes...only things visible from the exterior, that affect the "common" property.
2. Go for the glueless/snap lock type laminate if possible. Much simpler and much less messy to install than original Pergo.
3. Check with Home Depot/Lowes flooring depts. They usually offer free classes in laminate installation. I attended one and it was very helpful.

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Good idea, but don't feel obligated to buy your flooring there. Many better options and manufacturers exist. At least check them out. Ed
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wrote in message

helpful.
better
Any suggestions on a better place to purchase the flooring Ed. I'm in the Greater Toronto Area in Canada.
Peter H
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Look at the Flooring Dealers or Decorating Centers. They often carry better brands at competitive prices. I bought Mannington. You can find a dealer at www.mannington.com There are many good brands out there so don't limit your choices. Wilson Art is a good one also. www.wilsonart.com
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Peter H wrote:

One of the goals in flooring is that the foot lands at the same height. This is why we use different thicknesses of underflooring. Stepping from a deep pile carpet up 1/2 inch to a wood floor and down 1/2 to a vinyl floor may be possible, but it gives a sense of discomfort at some level.
REMOVE the baseboard until you're done flooring. Leave a gap for expansion. Don't buy the cheapest stuff you get at the cheapest place. Buy the stuff you want at a SMART place. If you save $50 at Home Depot over your flooring place, you'll make up for it when your locally owned flooring place can do weird stuff like:
- Give you reasonable advice on installation (he wants your repeat business and recommendations to friends) - Suggest where you might RENT the tools you need. - Suggest a decent carpenter who might aid you with some of the finish up stuff (like baseboards) if you need it.
The big box stores want your cash and they want you gone. Some of them have very qualified people there (they had jobs before HD drove those jobs out of business), some of the people there are lucky they get paid everyweek. coin toss.
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The store I bought it from lent me the tools and a video. He also had a better quality brand and went over every aspect of my particular situation to be sure I had the right material for transition and trimming and vapor barrier. He also ordered in extra and would take back any unopened boxes.
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I've experienced this first hand. Went with cheap "formica" laminate ordered from ifloor and tried to install myself. Sucked. Very precise installation method. I've installed pergo, etc., and couldn't get this one.
Couldn't return. Since I didn't buy from the local dealer, they weren't willing to help. Ended up paying through the nose to get it down. When it was done, it ended up costing me what I would for very nice, solid hardwood.
Go the with the local guys and when you buy, ask if they'll come help (for a fee, of course) if you get in trouble. Get that quote up front.

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