Kroil vs. Liquid wrench for loosening stuck Water heater anode rod


A recent post recommended applying Kroil daily for a week to loosen up a stuck anode rod in a water heater.
- Is Kroil significantly better than more commonly available brands such as Liquid wrench?
- Does applying it repeatedly add much effect beyond the first 2-3 applications?
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blueman wrote:

YES .. keep it wet for a few days if possible
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Kroil or PB Blaster is the best stuff. Not sure about getting anodes out, as there is a corrosion there, and an actual fusing of metal.
Good luck.
Steve
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Wuerth Rost Off is also right up there, but good luck finding it in a store. I ordered a couple cans to fill out an order with a german car parts place once to get the minimum dollar value for free shipping, and I love the stuff. Wish I could find some more.
nate
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be certain the tank is secure before applying pressure to the anode fitting heard of a powerful fellow who broke some water line connections trying to loosen the anode...
lets just say he was sorry he ever began the project, after one line leaked later and flooded his below ground basement
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After application of the penetrating oil give it a couple of taps with a hammer. This used to be part of the directions on Liquid Wrench label. Apparently the vibration helps it to penetrated.Also trying to tighten it a little more will often help break it free better than trying to loosen it. If it gives a little on tightening then alternately loosen and tighten while adding more oil until it frees up
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

Excellent advice which also applies to the replacement of water valves for the sink or toilet.
After installation, open the valves all the way, then close for about 1/8th of a turn. This provides some "slack" for later in case the el-cheapo valve sticks.
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on 9/16/2009 7:48 AM (ET) HeyBub wrote the following:

Any valves I install or replace now are 1/4 turn valves.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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let us know if attempting anode replacement somehow has side effect within 6 months requiring new tank. .........
I think its best to leave water heaters alone till they die, they arent that costly to buy to start with looked at as yearly cost per tank and every new tank sees improved efficency over my old one.
but good luck on the anode relacement.
start job in early morning, shop for new heater in advance, and have fun
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willshak wrote:

Me too. I had a post here a couple of months ago about replacine a couple of outside taps. No reason for replacing the taps, just a nice little week-end project.
Turns out the mortar through which the pipes protruded had eaten through the galvanized pipes holding the original taps! A little twist on the valve and the pipe disintegrated! Shit!
Had to chisel out about twelve bricks around each pipe, get new 10" extensions, re-mortar the bricks, and so on. A beastly project, yet it probably prevented a ton of damage (one of the pipes was already leaking ever so slightly).
Yep, the 1/4 valves saved me.
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My dad use to teach to open or close a valve all the way, minus half turn. That way the next guy would have half turn, and know the valve stem wasn't rotted in place. Rather than thinking the valve stem was rotted, and crank on it with a big wrench.
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

After application of the penetrating oil give it a couple of taps with a hammer. This used to be part of the directions on Liquid Wrench label. Apparently the vibration helps it to penetrated.Also trying to tighten it a little more will often help break it free better than trying to loosen it. If it gives a little on tightening then alternately loosen and tighten while adding more oil until it frees up
Jimmie
And it helps to use a back up wrench wherever possible so you don't twist the whole thing off.
Steve
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