Knocking out Drywall

What's the most efficient way to knock out drywall? I need to demo a couple of walls down to the studs. Thx
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Alan Smithee wrote:

Poke a hole with a hammer, grab the edges and pull. For the other side of the wall you can stay on the same of the wall and push/kick the opposite side drywall.
R
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couple
Duh- accidently mailed this while sleep-reading around 0300.
Thereputic, but messy. I recommend long vertical Sawzall cuts in the middle of the stud cavities. You can then rock each section, and take it out in bigger cleaner chunks. Try not to cut any live wiring or plumbing, if they are to be reused. If you don't already have one, I recommend investing in a medium-size Stanley Wonder Bar- the uses will become obvious once you start.
If you want to save the other walls and ceilings in those rooms, don't forget to slit the inside corners with a sharp utility knife before you start. Otherwise, the tape is likely to pull off the surface paper on areas you don't want to damage. Depending on how well the corners and ceiling were mudded, you may need to surgically remove the mud and tape from the remaining half of the joint to get a decent mud job once you reskin the wall.
aem sends...
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If'n you want to cut something you don't want to cut, go at it with a SawZall. Better yet, just get a fire axe and put up a few pictures of in-laws for motivation.
I recommend taking it out in small chunks so you can see around the back and not pull or cut anything you don't want to.
It comes off fast and easy once you get the first hole. Buy a couple of flat bars and a cat claw nail puller. After that, just grunt and bear it.
Steve
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Thanks everyone. Not an easy job but a few tips always speed things up.
wrote

and
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Excellent technique. That is the easiest way I found.
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Excellent technique. That is the easiest way I found.
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Alan Smithee wrote:

There is no 'neat' way to do it. It is a messy job and the rock is going to come off in small pieces. Punch a hole and start yanking. If it was screwed, you are into a slow process of removing them, nails aren't too bad but it is still tedious. Worst part of the job is the cleanup.
Harry K
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Get you some trash cans first thing. And a wheelbarrow.
Make a hole and then make it bigger. Don't do a lot of smashing, as there are wires and pipes and things in there that you can damage and cause more work. As the hole gets bigger, it gets easier to see what is holding it on. Pull nails with a prybar, or take out screws with a screwgun.
Not a clean job, but just TAKE IT SLOW, break up the trash as you go, and you will be done shortly. A big shop vac helps to keep the dust from going all over the house.
Steve
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Don't do what you see on the home fix-it TV shows where they start swinging heavy sledge hammers to take out a little drywall. You could rip out live wires or split open water pipes and damage other things inside the wall. It is simple, one guy on TV who does it differently just punches a hole between the studs with his fist and starts pulling down drywall. Most other people just use a claw hammer to make a small hole and use the claw to pull the rest off the studs.

couple
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