Knob and Tube BETA-33

Page 5 of 5  
Terry wrote:

. What grounded surfaces are there near the screwshell?

If you find the splices, you have probably found the bad connection. The way I read your post you want to make the K&T circuit a 'proper' 3-way. The circuit could also be rewired with Romex as several have suggested.
Life is a series of trade-offs.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I am really just beating a dead horse now. The suggestion to replace it is, of course, the best solution.
From what I have read in the last couple of days, you can repair an existing K&T circuit if it met the code requirements at the time. So if BETA had a "proper" 3-way switching arrangement and a broken hot wire, the way I see it, he could just butt splice a new piece of wire in it's place. You can still use K&T to repair K&T.
I don't think the switching arrangement we are assuming BETA has was ever code compliant so it would not be legal to repair it.
One other thing BETA should consider is that the neutral wire could still be in use. And splicing a neutral together that is still in use can cause dancing. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry wrote:

Problems are likely to be at soldered joints. I have seen 2 failed solder joints (one in K&T) - both were "cold joints" - defective when made.

I have seen the Carter circuit a couple of times and it seems to come up occasionally on this newsgroup. I suspect it was once compliant, but I don't know. Wiring practice has changed a lot. No one has ever said definitively it was or wasn't once compliant. Anyone know any really old electricians?
--
bud--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It was first made illegal in 1920 Nec 380.2 which required three way and four way switching to be done only in the ungrounded conductor, but of course it continued to be used to save $$$

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RBM wrote:

How interesting.
The other question, I suppose, is whether the NEC was adopted in a jurisdiction when a house was built. It was common for jurisdictions to have their own codes. I looked up an article in an IEEE newsletter that said heavy pressure to adopt the NEC (and one of the major building codes) came in the 1960s.
But the 1920 date for the NEC should be an early landmark. Thanks.
--
bud--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks Terry and everyone else for all of your suggestions and the time and energy you put into trying to help me get this fixed.
I finally decided to give up. I took up 2 more boards in the attic floor and got better access to the wiring to the hallway light from above. Then I used the inductance tester to see if I could find any "hot" wires. Neither wire going to the hallway light was hot, and I traced both back as far as I could and got the same thing. Those wires and all 6 wires to the two 3-way switches all showed no power.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

i would get really interested in your wiring, since you dont know what failed there might be more and the next failure could start a fire.,
in my job i see wiring burn up all the time.
12 and 14 gauge wire burned up carrying 15 amps. they are connected to a switch
might be a good idea to get a electrician to look at everything.........
house fires are nasty,,,,,
it would be sad to have a fire, open walls and find the same failure that caused the fire had caused this outage.,,,,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.