kitchen sink drip


I have an old kitchen sink from the 1940's. The facets are probably 30 years old. The facets are "wall mounted" into the actual sink. I do not want to replace the facets, but find I am continualy replacing the washers, but it continues to drip. I turn the handles firmly off, but this seems to actually "eat up" the rubber washers. Any ideas on how to solve my "dripping problem" would be greatly apprecialted.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The faucet "seats" (the part the washers bear down against) are probably corroded or chewed up and are grinding away at the rubber washers each time a faucet is closed or opened.
You can probably smooth out the seats with an inexpensive tool made for the job, like this one:
http://tinyurl.com/6royze
Good luck,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jul 29, 10:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The washer seats are probably all pitted since the 60's and the washers cant seat anymore. If you can completely dismantle the faucets you may be able to regrind the seats smoother, or maybe there is mineral deposit around the seats, but I would just look for a new replica of the old faucet and replace it all.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RickH wrote:

The washer seats may be replaceable. Dismantle the valve & look inside to see if the seat is a separate piece that screws into the valve body.
--Steve
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve is right. Most faucets from back then had replaceable seats. Use a flashlight and look at the center of the seat. You're looking for either a four-sided pattern or a hex pattern. If you see that, go to Home Depot and buy a "seat removal wrench". It's a long skinny wrench with flats or hex and it will unscrew the old seat. Then go to a plumbing supply house and buy new seats. They usually run about $4 each. New seats and new washers will solve the problem. Refacing the seat with those cheap tools almost never works over the long term. Just can't get them smooth enough.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.