Kitchen Sink DIY?

As I always say when I post, I'm not much of a handyman, but I'm learning. We need to replace our kitchen sink and I've already purchased the replacement. We intend on keeping the hardware, but the sink was chipped pretty badly from someone dropping something heavy onto it.
I know someone who will replace the sink pretty cheaply, and he'd even do plumbing, if necessary. I think I have almost an identical replacement so I'm hoping that no actual changes to the plumbing will be required.
My question is this: is replacing a sink (and keeping the old hardware) sufficiently difficult that I should probably leave it to someone else, assuming that I've never done it before and haven't even seen it done? :-) Or, if I'm brave, is it sufficiently simple that I can do it myself as long as I pay attention to how things came off?
Thanks! John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes, assuming that the old and new sinks are the same size (including depth), have the same faucet hole pattern and mount in the same manner (both overmount or both undermount). If the depths are different you will probably have to adjust the "P" trap under the sink.
You'll probably need a "basin wrench". It is an inexpensive piece of hardware that lets you easily reach the nuts that hold on the faucet. Pick up a small tub of plumper's putty too so you can put a bead under the new sink, faucet nuts and drain.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

I have some plumber's putty that I needed for another small project, but the sink came with some Kitchen & Bath silicone sealant. I don't have a basin wrench, though. I have crescent wrenches, channel locks, and some wrenches and things, but that's about it. I probably should pick up some more tools if I'm going to start doing more around the house. :-)
Thanks! John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read all the tips people here give you, then give it a try. What do you have to lose?
If it goes in, great. You'll feel proud of yourself and save some money. If it doesn't, then call in a plumber and be sure to keep your day job.
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Blaine wrote:

Assuming I don't have to do any "real" plumbing (translation: my new sink is the correct size), do I only need a basin wrench in addition to the tools I mentioned? Will I need anything special to get the rest of the old hardware off? Even if I don't need anything else, can you think of anything that might make things easier?
Speaking of a basin wrench, I just looked them since I didn't even know what they looked like. At first glance, I don't even see how they work, but then I've never needed one before. I guess there's nothing like buying one and using it to learn how to use it, huh? :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't need one.
The basin wrench is used to reach up between the sink and back of cabinet to remove the nuts holding the faucets in place. Since you are removing the old sink, just disconnect the faucets and drain line, then lift the entire assembly up and out. Remove the faucets and put them on the new sink, as well as the trap. Reverse the procedure to install with a new rim seal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

As someone in your exact situation about six months ago, I did a successful replacement of my sink. As this person suggested, I would highly recommend that you attach as much of the hardware to the upsidedown sink as possible *before* putting the sink in place - my neck was killing me by the end of the day because I didn't do that. This might also alleviate the need for a basin wrench.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

That works too :) (I had just awakened from a nap)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Okay, I've got everything disconnected and I'm ready to pull my sink out. Unfortunately, the darn thing is attached pretty firmly. I've undone the mounting screws, so it seems like all that's holding it to the counter is the sealant. Any tips on how to pry this thing off without hurting something, including myself? ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

-- Just pry it up, very carefully, so you don't damage the counter top. If you can pry it up from underneath so you don't pry up the counter top there's less chance of damaging the counter top.
When it's up scrape all the old sealant off and use a scowering pad with ajax to clean the counter top competely.
You didn't say how old the faucet is and if it works properly. If there's any doubt the best time to change the faucet is when you have the sink out.
Good luck, PJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it was put down with silicon it won't pry very easily...use a thin bladed knife to slip under the rim and cut loose. You may have to pry, cut a bit, pry some more, cut more...etc.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Enter "install kitchen sink" in Google-- then jump back. There's dozens of sites that will tell you what to do and how to do it.
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.