kitchen remodel wiring

Will be redoing the kitchen completely. Kitchen is approx 50 feet at opposite corner of house. Need to run several 20 amp lines, lighting lines, dishwasher , refrig , electric oven.
Instead of running all these lines to the service panel is a subpanel in the basebent below the kitchen the better or proper way to go. Live in westchester county New York.
Appreciate any help, Thanks
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Not necessarily, especially if there's enough room in the main service panel.
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IMO, a subpanel is the way to go. Code requires lots of dedicated circuits in the kitchen and it's a lot easier to keep all those runs short with one heavy long line to the main. If you have a broom closet or pantry off the kitchen, you could even put the sub in there if it results in shorter runs than a basement location. More convenient when a circuit pops as well (although that doesn't happen much with all the dedicated circuits now).
The branch circuit breaker cost will be a wash either way, and you'll probably save the cost of the sub and the feed breaker in wire and time (wire's gotten pricey!).
HTH,
Paul
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This is why you shouldn't get advice from the internet!
You CAN do this if your closet is kept empty and you have room to shove a refrigerator box in there and up against the panel. (that is the easiest way to visualize working space) A panel requires "working space" and that is a clear area in front of it 30" wide and 3 feet deep for a height of 6 1/2 feet. Certainly this gets abused as people move their shit in but you should never start out in a spot that can never have enough space.
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Ron wrote:

Use a subpanel if the main panel is getting full. Otherwise, it's just confusing (unless the subpanel is actually in the kitchen.)
I'd look into running an edison circuit for the two 20A appliance circuits to reduce the voltage drop and let me run just one long cable -- plus I could put one 240V outlet somewhere for a British electric kettle.
Bob
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