Kitchen Remodel Wiring

I'm in the process of tearing up the kitchen and just mapped out the current wiring. I'm doing a complete remodel and am moving just about everything around. I currently have the following circuits and plans:
Circuit 1: 240V 30A (currently not used - gas range)
Plan to move outlet behind new range location just in case it is needed in the future. Will splice in basement so no buried connections.
Circuit 2: 120V 20A Currently: Refrigerator, gas range, range hood. Plan moves gas stove to other wall, so will probably just be the refrigerator and a counter outlet. Will add GFCI even though not directly by water (about 9' across from sink)
Circuit 3: 120V 20A Currently: Dishwasher, two counter outlets, switched light over sink, two living room outlets. Plan to remove the dishwasher and add GFCI and a couple more outlets on the counter for convienience. Will also have micro/hood, gas range and will probably tap in some additional lighting (not more than 250 Watts or so).
Circuit 4: 120V 20A Currently: Disposal on switched outlet. Will move to a switched outlet at the new sink location.
I will add a new circuit for the dishwasher. Do I need to make this a 20 amp or is 15 sufficient? Will put in an outlet behind the dishwasher location for convenience.
I was also thinking it might be good to extend a couple outlets off circuit 2 to the new counter outlets. That way I won't trip the breaker if someone decides to run the microwave, can opener, blender, toaster, and whatever other appliance at the same time.
I've got 100Amp service in a new panel that was just installed this summer when they found the old one full of water while wiring the new AC.
All appliance will be brand new, so that should cut down some energy use there too.
Anything I am missing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

loads.
Range hood good place to plant a 20 amp circuit for the over the range micro wave. That I will install.

Diswasher is a fixed appliance seperate circuit. Lighting is seperate circuit.

dishwasher, not any more.

I like to stagger outlet circuits. That way if someone plugs in a load in this one the next outlet is another circuit so that they can contiune to do their cooking

Remodels can be anything from current codes to god anything goes. Comments in the body
Suggest you check with the authorities to see what you need to do locally. Jurisitiction folks across the country have differing ideas of what is required. Lots of circuits in a kitchen is always a good thing. Where I live all kitchen outlets are now GFCI even if not next to water. Just like all new bedrooms are arc-faults, now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Be certain that the new circuits meet all local codes. Where I live, separate circuits have to serve the fridge, exhaust fan, and backsplash receptacles. As a matter of relative ease of wiring once the walls were torn up, we also put in separate circuits for dishwasher, each of 2 ovens, toaster plugin, toaster-oven plugin, disposal, and instant hot water dispenser. Ended up with 11 circuits, in all. Basically ran a 50amp line to what is now the kitchen subpanel, on the outside of the house. While we were at it, we ran two spare circuits from this subpanel for two bathrooms, and ran the romex into those rooms, which may be re-done some time in the future. At some point you might fret about not having added enough capacity in the kitchen area. Very unlikely that you would ever say " I just put in too many circuits!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The refrig should not be on a GFIC as it could trip and ruin the food. Not recommended by code. It should be on its own circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

Personally I like the Frig to share a circuit with something that I would notice quickly if it were out, like an overhead light.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
While that logic makes sense to me, the NEC doesn't allow kitchen outlet circuits to be shared with lighting or even outlets in any other room except a dining room

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ideally the fridge should be on it's own circuit. This circuit should never 'go out' unless the fridge trips it (assuming people aren't playing with the breakers) and if the fridge trips it, you probably have a dead fridge anyway...
-Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the fridge off the GFIC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess I will be opening more walls than initially planned. New plan:
Add circuit for microwave. (Can gas range share this, or should that be on the counter circuit?)
Add circuit for dishwasher.
Add a second countertop circuit - stagger outlets with the existing one.
Remove the extra outlet on the fridge circuit and add it to a counter circuit.
Move the disposal switch/outlet.
All lighting on the existing lighting circuit.
I'll probably abandon the 220V range circuit for now. It is easy to access through the basement if it is ever needed in the future.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Current NEC requires minimum of two 20 amp circuits to feed kitchen outlets. No lighting or exhaust fan can be on these circuits and all counter outlets must be GFCI protected. All counter spaces of 12 inches or more require and outlet and no point along the counter space can be farther than 24 inches from an outlet. Appliances like a built in microwave require a dedicated circuit. Your 30 amp 240volt circuit would be two small for an electric range, but possibly large enough for a combination gas/electric model, and must be four wire by current code

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In addition to all the comments about what can and can't be shared and how much current etc. The one the inspector is most likely to get you with is the 2 foot/4 foot rule.
Code requires that an outlet be positioned no more than 2 feet from any spot on the counter and no more than 4 feet from the next outlet. They can be closer. For rooms, they use the 3 foot/6 foot rule.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The living room outlets I referenced are actually in the dining area. I think it is called a dining L.
No problem with the 2/4 foot rule. I want lots of outlets, so will have plenty staggered.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.