Kitchen recessed lighting, flourescent screw in vs dedicated

I'd like to use flourescent bulbs in our remodeled kitchen's recessed fixtures - I think. I'm not sure they'll be bright enough, but expect they will be. My main concern is whether to install the dedicated flourescent cans, or keep my options open by installing screw base fixutures that would use the screw base flourscent bulbs. I know code in my area requires some dedicated flour fixtures in the kitchen.
I have a bunch of questions, I'll put them all out enmass, and will appreciate any input.
Are there any inherant advantages to the cans that have built in ballast etc?
Some of the screw based flourescent bulbs seem to turn on without delay; some have a one second delay.
Some are flourescent bulbs have a very white light and some are more rosy...would prefer the rosy, but not sure how to spec to supplier?
Screw base flourescent bulbs can be either the naked type (coils exposed) or there are also some that have the coils inside a 'floodlight' type glass enclousure. I thought these might be a good compromise, since can's reflective trim is sheilded from dust etc. Also, not sure but wondered if they don't throw more light, or throw it more widely, since the bulb extents just beyond the trim.
If I use the naked coil screw base, or the dedicated prong base, with a reflective trim, I'm concerned that kitchen oils etc will end up on the reflective trim and need cleaning. But does that really occur?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Nano, Here's my experience. I put 6 potlights in my kitchen. I didn't want halogen lights so I purchased a package of regular 6" incandescent fixtures which included 6 X 75W flood light bulbs. I didn't want to use all the included bulbs for energy usage reasons but I didn't want to just throw out the working bulbs either. So I purchased some fluorescent bulbs from Costco, I don't recall the wattage but they were 75W equivalent and used 3 of each. They were the flood style with the twist inside.
When I first turned them on I was concerned, the fluorescent bulbs seemed to not work but then flickered on after a few seconds. They were noticeably dimmer than the incandescent as well. However after about 10 minutes I could no longer tell the difference between the two styles of bulbs. For a short time the fluorescents took a little while to flick on and warm up but after a couple of days as far as I can tell they turned on instantly and at or near full brightness. So I'm very happy with them.
I cant see what the advantage of ballast type fixtures would be.
, I got a good price on a package that included

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So why use them? Sure they last longer and CAN use less electricity but what about the impact on the environment? Is it realistic to expect people to store used flourescent lights and ballasts in protective containers until the local government comes up with a way to safely recycle them? Or will homeowners more likely toss them in the can with their milk jugs and wine bottles for 'recycling'.
http://www.worldwise.com/recfluorlig.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Limp Arbor wrote:

More than just can - they have a high rate of actually doing so.

Positive, considering that a good chunk of USA's electricity is from coal burning plants. The amount of mercury emitted by burning enough coal to produce 75 watts for 4,000 hours is much more than the amount of mercury in a 19, 20 or 23 watt CFL.

Actually mentions that on average, fluorescents in lieu of incandescents results in a net reduction of mercury pollution, but does advise to recycle fluorescent lamps.
The ballast recycling advice applies mainly to 2-bulb rapid start ballasts, since the issue is oil filled capacitors. The ballasts in screw-in CFLs do not have those, nor in general do ballasts for 1-lamp fluorescents less than 30 watts. Also in general, electronic ballasts do not have oil filled capacitors.
As for options and legal requirements in your area - www.lamprecycle.org
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just use normal cans and get the correct flood shaped CF bulbs, you will most likely be happy with them but that way you keep your options open. Cheaper too. I replaced 6 halogen 65 watt bulbs in my kitchen with the equivalent fluorescents ( I think they are 13 watt, I'm too lazy to go check one), they have been in there over a year with no failures. They actually are brighter than the halogens, and nearly as white. They do take a second to light and a little while ( maybe a minute) to come up to full brightness but they are great after that. I don;t think they cost any more than the halogens I had in there did either. Mine were from Lowes, but you can get them anyplace these days. As for color, you might as well try a few and see which one you like, then buy the rest, but realistically once you get used to them you won't notice the difference anyway, they will look 'normal' to you.
--
Mikey S.
"nano" < snipped-for-privacy@nano.ono> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Definitely. Screw-in compact fluorescents tend to have their ballasts overheat when they are used in cans.

The better ones have a slight to 1 second delay. This is for warming up the filaments first, to reduce starting-related wear.

This is usually specified as "color temperature". Usual ones are:
2700 - usual compact fluorescent color, orangish to roughly incandescent color.
3500 - a "whiter shade of warm white" - my favorite, but mainly for brighter lighting conditions. It can look a little dreary in dimmer lighting conditions - in which case a lower color temperature such as 2700 would be better.
4100 - "cool white color", plain white, though with better color rendering than "old tech cool white".
5000 - an icy cold pure white.

In general, ones with outer bulbs have a wider temperature range, but also start dimmer and have a greater need to warm up.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LED bulbs will be the next great thing so go with the plain cans.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's going to be a while before they get that good and actually more economical than fluorescents. Before they do, you will be seeing them for use in fixtures with fluorescent ballasts.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.