Kitchen recesed lights

Which recessed lights 4" or 5" are most suitable for kitchen with 8' ceiling? How far should they be spaced apart? I read 32" from the wall is an optimal distance for the recessed lights. I visited HomeDepot today and found they have Halo and Commercial Electric recessed lights. I used only Halo 6" throughout my house and do not have any complains. Commercial electric seems to be cheaper then Halo. Is it good brand?
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Judge the fixture by the lamp it uses, not the physical size. All manufacturers will have photometric charts to show what the proper spacing should be. If you are pleased with a particular lamp type, then use it in the kitchen. I personally like Halo brand and find them reasonably priced. In kitchens I have always arranged the fixtures 26 inches out from the wall over counter top areas. This spreads the light well over the counter top and into the room and prevents shadows while you are working

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Up in Alberta I don't see recessed lights being sold in big box stores any more. There are certainly no such lights in the newer (<10yr) houses I've been to. I remember news reports from something like 15 years ago where there were a number of house fires due to heat build-up in the ceiling insulation over the recessed pots due to improper installation or whatever. You may want to consider this fire risk possibility first before deciding whether recessed ceiling lights are worth their looks.
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Can lights are as popular as ever, The small halogen bulbs are popular 4-5 inch is normal. How close depends on what you want to accent, experiment. If you want the counter lit and have cabinets above then 6" out may be needed , in kitchens you want a good work area. Experiment first. Halogens come in 5 different beam patterns to light what you want.
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Theyre still using the can/pot lights in new homes. We have about 20 in our new place but they're more stylish than the old 7-8" ers.

There are ordinary (cheap) can lights for uninsulated ceilings. They're easy to throw in.
For insulated ceiling can lights, they are more expensive and have to be installed more carefully. There are also thin clear plastic boxes that act as a vapor barrier that go over the can and help to keep the insulation off the box. These cans have also have an overheat sensor in them to shut themselves down if they begin to get too hot. I'd suggest that if the OP doesn't know how to put them in to code, to let a pro do it.
Rudy
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Since the 70's at least in the U.S. all recessed lights have had high temperature cutouts to prevent fires, now there are also IC or insulated housings and airtight assemblies to prevent heat loss through the fixtures. you just need to use the appropriate product for your application
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