Kitchen range-switching from gas to electric 240v ?

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Well since electric heat was always near 100% efficent a new electric resistance furnace wouldnt likely save you much money.
Thats going electric resistance to electric resistance.....
electric resistance to ANYTHING else will likely save you money!
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Pete C. wrote:

Good point.
I live in a duplex - one side is my office. The gas company charges, as I recall, about $11.00/month just to be connected. I don't begrudge them that - they have to read the meter, send out a bill, keep records - as overhead.
With about two hours work and a bit of pipe, I connected both halves of the duplex to the same meter. It wasn't hard; the two water heaters sat on opposite sides of a common wall. Simply poking a hole in the wall and joining the gas supply lines together was relatively easy.
A call to the gas company to drop service one one side of the duplex resulted in a savings of over $100/year.
Wait, there's more!
The remaining meter is the one servicing the "office" side of the duplex and the bill is paid by a company check.
Deductible.
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HeyBub wrote:

You're using the law to save money but the tax weasels will claim your use of company utilities is compensation. The thought of how much money and government resources to go after you for that would boggle the mind.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

No, the business charges me a modest amount for utilities (water also). Our coporate tax attorney told me to forget about it inasmuch as it is way below the de minimus rule, but I, being as righteous as a disciple, said "Render unto Caesar..." and so forth.
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HeyBub wrote:

Aye, yer an honest lad, Slΰinte mhςr agad!
Nope, it's not Klingon.
TDD
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HeyBub wrote:

if I give them an address....
--
aem sends...

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Pete C. wrote:

You must have a magic electric stove. Mine takes at least 2 minutes before the burner cools enough to not continue boiling over a pot.
As far as cost, that depends on your local rates. Some places pay 4 or more time as much for electricity as others. Gas for heating is probably half the cost of electric heating here, as determined by converting from electric to gas.
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Bob F wrote:

Perhaps I'm the magic element, since I have never had that issue on at least a half dozen different electric ranges I have cooked extensively on.

Electric resistive heating, or electric heat pump? A heat pump is 3-4X the efficiency of electric resistive heating. I drastically cut my heating costs when I replaced electric resistive with electric heat pump.
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Pete C. wrote:

You are right about heat pumps. The capital costs are considerable, and depending on your situation, the outdoor noise may be a problem with neighbors, but they certain will compete with gas for energy cost if it's not too cold where you live.
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Bob F wrote:

Well, noise isn't a consideration since there is an A/C condenser outside anyway since much of the year is cooling season. The A/C or heatpump condenser also faces my shop which is some 80' away from the house. The next neighbor is another 100' or so and that side of their house has no windows.
As for capital costs, I just installed this new 4T heat pump along with matching air handler for a total cost of $3,750 which qualifies as pretty damned cheap in my book. As for efficiency, my monitoring indicates that it works well down to about 28F outdoor temp, and north TX doesn't get a lot of days below 28F. It was also a good jump in efficiency vs. the old A/C, so there is savings in the cooling months as well.
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Pete C. wrote:

28F is really warm winter weather in much of the USA.
Where I live in Seattle, A/C is unnecessary for a well insulated house. Yes, it gets warm inside several days a year but not bad if I vent it good in the morning, and then close it up to keep out the heat.
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Bob F wrote:

Not N. TX. for the more northern locations with more cold days and colder temps on those days, you just switch to a ground source heat pump instead of an air source one. Here with few really cold days, the cost of using the backup heat those days is minimal and the cost premium to go ground source isn't worth it.

When I lived in CT, A/C wasn't needed much on a reasonably insulated, shaded house, but a dehumidifier definitely was. Even here in TX, the "neutral" month or so between heating and cooling seasons tends to need a dehumidifier. I hate humid.
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Pete C. wrote:

I'll have to say, after living in Detroit and Boston, I don't miss hot and humid weather on bit.
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Pete C. wrote:

If you hate humidity, stay away from Bama. When I lived out in the middle of the Pacific ocean, the humidity wasn't as bad as my home.
TDD
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I cooked on electric for forty years. I switched to gas about 5 years ago. It took me about two days to start wondering why the hell I didn't do it forty years earlier. -- Doug
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On May 15, 12:18οΏ½am, snipped-for-privacy@INVALID.com(Phil) wrote:

If cost is a issue try craiglist and just pick up a used gas range.
If you fear gas from the crack BANG description..............
You havent heard anything like the BANG caused by a electric stove elements wire frying off. They can sound like a explosion.With lots of sparks, your own mini fireworks display right in your own kitchen:(
converting to electric range will cost you a fortune, they draw high current and you might need a new main panel and guaranteed new 240 volt wiring.
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Probably something shorted -- may well have been a failed light bulb -- and tripped the circuit breaker. Have you reset the breaker? Repair may be as simple as replacing the oven lamp and resetting the breaker. Even if it's more complicated than that, it's cheaper to repair than to replace.

Why would you even consider that? Gas is far superior to electric for cooking: - it heats up faster - it cools off faster - you have much finer control over the temperature - it's generally much cheaper to operate
"Cools off faster" may not seem at first like an important feature, but consider what happens when a pot starts to boil over. With a gas range, you turn the flame down, and the boilover subsides instantly. Problem over. With an electric range, even if you turn the burner completely *off* it takes several minutes to cool below the boiling point, during which time the pot boils over anyway. The *only* way to stop a boilover on an electric range is to grab the pot and move it to a different burner -- not something you really want to do when boiling water is spilling over the top of it. Or consider what happens when a sauce you're making gets a bit too hot. With a gas range, just turn the heat down, no problem. With an electric range, again, you need to move the pan to a different burner. If you're in the middle of preparing a big meal and have all four burners in use, tough luck: you just burned your sauce.
Electric ranges suck.
For baking, it doesn't make much difference. Electric ovens and gas ovens cook about the same.

If you've been cooking with a gas range for thirty-seven years, you're going to absolutely *hate* using an electric one.

Correct on both counts.

You would need to call an electrician to run a completely new circuit. There is no "convert" here. The existing circuit is either 15A or 20A, and consists of two wires plus ground. An electric range will require a minimum of 30A, probably 40A, and maybe 50A, consisting of *three* wires plus ground -- which means the existing wiring *cannot* be used. Neither can the existing breaker.
Furthermore, a new 240V circuit will require two spaces in your electrical panel, whereas the existing 120V circuit requires only one. You may or may not have enough space available in the panel to do this.
Bottom line: you can buy a brand-new gas stove for less money than you'd spend hiring an electrician [*] to install a new 40A 240V circuit to enable you to use an electric stove -- which you'd still have to buy afterwards. You have three options: repair the existing range, replace it with a new gas range, or replace it with a new electric range. The last option is the most expensive, and offers by far the worst cooking performance. I see no point in it at all.
[*] No offense intended, but the fact that you had to ask the questions you asked shows that you don't have the knowledge required to safely install this circuit yourself, thus the necessity of hiring it done.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Largely over hyped differences. I'm a pretty serious cook, and I have no problem cooking on gas or electric. All it takes is the knowledge of the differences between the two. Not really any different than adapting between regular and convection ovens.

Not really, electric generally has significantly better controls, and electric doesn't add moisture to the oven.

Yes, the existing electric is almost certainly not useable for an electric range.
The cost/effort to install a new circuit for an electric range can span from trivial in a case like a ranch with an unfinished basement and the kitchen in close proximity to a modern electrical panel with available breaker spaces, to extreme in the case of finished spaces and the electrical panel at the opposite end of the house from the kitchen.

While I think the cooking performance argument is over hyped, the fact is that the cost difference between gas and electric ranges of comparable quality is negligible, so the cost to install a new circuit will make a new electric range the more expensive option, though if you have ideal conditions the difference may be small. If you have less than ideal conditions for running a new circuit, you can step up a couple quality levels on a new gas range for what it will cost to install a new circuit and buy a basic electric range.

Agree.
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Nonsense. The controls are basically identical, just a temperature dial.

Many would consider that to be a disadvantage...
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Doug Miller wrote:

Hardly. My electric oven has vastly better electronic controls and maintains tighter temperature control.

Many who don't know how to cook. It is very easy to add moisture in an electric oven for cooking tasks that will benefit from it. Conversely, it is impossible to eliminate the moisture in a gas oven for cooking tasks where it is a detriment.
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