Kitchen range-switching from gas to electric 240v ?

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They're still more expensive to operate than equivalent natural gas appliances.

Sounds like you've fallen for the propaganda from the electric utility monopolies...
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

If I were to go for an electric stove, it would be an induction stove, certainly not resistive heating.
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

The induction ones are interesting, but they limit your cookware choices and can obsolete cookware you already own. I've considered getting a single induction burner to play with. BTW, the induction burners *are* resistive, they basically cause the pan to be a shorted transformer secondary winding and the resistance to the current circulating in the pan produces the heat.
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Correct, but I still would call it inductive heating rather than using a resistive heating element. <grin>.
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Han
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My two favorite pans are a Falk copper and a Woll aluminum. They are deal killers for induction, but the concepts is interesting.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Nope, not in most cases. No nat gas here anyway, so it doesn't matter. Just my lowly little 20# LP tank feeding my dual fuel range.

Nope, I do the math. In the case of nat gas, what kills your theoretical savings is the monthly service charges for the many warm weather months months when you are using hardly any gas, particularly here in TX where the heating season is short.
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If you're incurring monthly service charges because there are months in which you use hardly any gas, it's your own fault. Replace your electric dryer with a gas dryer. Replace your electric water heater with a gas water heater. You'll be using more gas, obviously, but a whole lot less electricity.
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Doug Miller wrote:

<trimmed>
Nope, a gas water heater and dryer will still use very little gas here, and the electric ones I have use very little electricity. The monthly service charge for gas service would still eclipse the gas useage. Electricity use is predominantly A/C and refrigerator during the warm weather months, the water heater and clothes dryer hardly have any effect.
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Wrong. You obviously haven't ever lived with gas appliances; you clearly don't know *anything* about them.

A gas water heater and clothes dryer certainly consume enough gas to avoid minimum monthly service charges. Stop talking about things you know nothing about.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Perhaps if you are one of those wacko religious nuts with 43 kids. I'm one single person, I don't use enough hot water or do enough loads of laundry for the water heating or dryer consumption to be of any significance. As I said, A/C and refrigerator are the primary power consumers. My server rack in the garage is next in line.
I have not lived in a home with all gas appliances, nor would I want to due to their inherent safety hazard (my LP cooktop is about all I can tolerate and I have an LP detector in the kitchen). I have however done an extensive analysis of a years worth of utility bills from two comparable homes, one with gas appliances and one with electric and found that the much hyped "savings" simply didn't exist.
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Nope, just two. We do wash our clothes and bathe regularly, however. YMMV.
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That's quite obvious, actually, since you appear to know nothing at all about them.

You mean "due to your irrational fears"...
(my LP cooktop is about all I can

Uh-huh. Right.
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LP is far less safe than NG.
Natural gas is lighter than air and will escape out a high spot in a leak.
Whereas LP will hang around like in a pool till BAM it finds a ignition point:(
Oil furnaces appear to need much more service than NG..
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Doug Miller wrote:

I know more about them than you apparently.

Tell that to all the people who have been killed in residential gas explosions. Compare with all those who have not been killed in the non-existant residential oil or electrical explosions.

When you build the spreadsheet covering a full year of data for each house and take all costs into account, the truth doesn't match the hype.
Far too many people fail to do the analysis, and fall for the hype when they replace a 30 year old electric or oil heating system with a new gas one and suddenly see a huge savings. Of course you'll see a huge savings with 30 year newer equipment, and you'd see that same huge savings with a 30 year newer electric or oil system as well.
I recall Ed P. who posts here replaced his old oil system with a new state of the art oil system a year or two ago and did the analysis before and monitoring after and reported something like a 60% savings new vs. old.
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Nobody ever got electrocuted by a gas line, either. You're an idiot.
<plonk>
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Doug Miller wrote:

Good point. I'm sure the fatalities from electricity are way higher than from gas. Probably safer to remove all electric devices and wiring.
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"During a typical year, home electrical problems account for 67,800 fires, 485 deaths, and $868 million in property losses. Home electrical wiring causes twice as many fires as electrical appliances." http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/home_fire_prev/electrical.shtm

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Doug Miller wrote:

So how about posting the matching figures for explosions, fires and CO poisoning from residential gas service.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Actually, they have. Gas lines have been know to go live when there are grounding failures and electrocute people, the same as has happened with water lines.

No, I recognize the very real hazard. Do a search yourself and see how common residential gas explosions are.
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Pete C. wrote:

Myth Busters had an episode where they blew up a house with more than the recommended number of bug bombs. It seems that some people think more is better and the fumes from the foggers will ignite when coming in contact with stove and water heater pilot lights.
TDD
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