Kitchen range-switching from gas to electric 240v ?

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Don't know if this was mentioned already, but if you have a power failure, you can still use a gas stove. Not the oven, but the top burners.
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We found out, when the power was off for too long here in Jersey a few weeks back. Gas stove worked fine...
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

A generator solves that problem along with the defrosting freezer and stumbling around in the dark problems.
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But, but, you need tospend money to buy a generator and whatever switching is required so as not to kill the electric company's linemen. And then you have to keep purchasing gas for the generator and spend on annual maintenance. All that for a few hours (at most) of no power? Maybe when I need lifesaving medical equipment. Although, by that time I will have taken a little pill ...
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

It was the linemen who installed the infrastructure that fails for two weeks when a larger than average bird roosts on the wire. Who cares if they die?

Heh! During hurricane Yikes we were without power for almost two weeks. The sad part was that all the gas stations for 60 miles were also without power and couldn't pump fuel.
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HeyBub wrote:

Perhaps. But the fact is that there has never been a single documented case of a utility lineman being killed by an improperly connected generator. In every single lineman fatality related to a generator, the cause of the death has been the lineman not following procedures which specify that every line must be tested and grounded before working on it.
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You've just defined the cause differently. No one dies from jumping out of tall buildings, either, but dead is still dead.
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

Nope, I didn't define the cause of death differently, I defined it accurately. Cause of death - "Electrocution due to failure to test and ground the conductor before handling it" - that's it, period. It makes no difference the source of the electricity.
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You're either a liar or simply stupid.
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

Nope, but people who think these poor linemen were killed by some careless person with a generator are irrational and emotional.
The procedures for working on lines in the field state that *every* line must be tested and grounded before working on it without full protective equipment. If that procedure is followed, it is not possible to be electrocuted regardless of whether a power co generator is online or a home generator is online.
Every single lineman fatality related to a home generator is the result of their own carelessness in not following procedures.
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Pete C. wrote:

Having worked as an electrician and having installed and maintained high voltage equipment I can only tell you to treat electrical power with respect. Treat it like a rattle snake and don't assume it's dead. I work on everything as though it were hot, I've been zapped a number of times and I've had tools vaporized but I've been lucky to not have been seriously injured. Don't trust unlocked safety switches, put your own lockout padlock on any dangerous higher voltage system you're working on. If it can't be locked, disconnect the wires, tape them up and leave a "I'll stomp you until you quit twitching!" note on the panel. Years ago, I heard of an electrician working on one of the industrial sites in my area who was working on the connections for a 4160 transformer, that's 4,160 volts primary. He finished hooking up the high voltage side and when he leaned back, he heard a crackling sound and his hair stood up. There was a dumbass walking down a line of safety switches on a wall turning each one on/off and looking around. The electrician climbed down, walked up to said dumbass and beat him half to death. No one tried to stop him and no one would think about testifying against him. A foreman called an ambulance to pickup the dumbass saying he had been injured in a fall, dumbass never came back.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Yes, and the reason for grounding every conductor after testing is to ensure that it *will not go live* while you are working on it, even if another crew working down the road tries to power it up, or someone with an improperly connected home generator tries to power it up.

Good story, presumably from the days before lock-out tag-out. When I pulled my meter to replace my main panel, I did the full lock-out tag-out, even though I live alone in a single family house. You have to presume that some idiot will come by and try to fry you, even if the probability is extremely low.
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Pete C. wrote:

I heard the story back in the early 70's when OSHA was in its infancy and the old, old school solder and friction tape guys were still in great abundance in the work force. Most of the safety practices I incorporate into my projects would be considered time wasting sissy stuff by those guys. The crazy old electricians in the sawmills in central Alabama would lay #6 bare copper on the sawmill floor, cover the wires with a deep layer of sawdust and run the 3 phase 460 volt saw motors off of it. One brain damaged old coot would check for the presence of 460 volt power by swiping his fingertip across the bare wire to see if he got a tingle.
TDD
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Han wrote:

I spent about $800 on a generator, about 25 years ago. Maintenance consists of $4 worth of synthetic oil each year. It has provided power during many days worth of outages, including a ~72hr continuous run. Many of these outages were in the winter in the northeast where frozen pipes would have been a threat had I not had the generator. Being portable, the generator has also been used on a number of remote construction projects as well. So yes, a generator is a very inexpensive and reasonable investment.
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That's relative. Until a month or so ago, we never had more than a few hours of power outage at a time. For that an expense of $1500 today plus the maintenance and risk of storing gasoline etc is NOT worth it. To me <grin>.
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Han
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Han wrote:

If you don't want to store gasoline, siphon it out of your car when you need it.
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Not easily done these days. Tanks have all sorts of devices to prevent that now.
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Bob F wrote:

I'm always amazed by the folks who think storing a 5gal can of gas out back is some huge risk, and then park a car or two with 15-20gal of gas each in their garage. Get a grip folks, storing a can of gas is not a big risk.
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Pete C. wrote:

Not a BIG risk, no, but gas cans don't have vapor recovery canisters to catch any fumes outgassing from the tank on a hot day when the garage gets close to 100 degrees inside. Not to mention, gas cans are a lot more prone to getting leaks, or getting knocked over by short people, sometimes with less-than-tight lids. For people without backyard sheds to keep the gas can in (along with the mower), I recommend they build a little 3-sided box with a roof, or something, to keep the rain off the can and the mower. IIRC, at one house my mother had, we used stacks of concrete block, a few pavers for for a floor, and a hunk of corrugated roofing that was laying around. Think farmer's equipment shed, just real small. And if they want pretty, Rubbermaid has a nice line of trash can enclosures that work well for the task.
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aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Have you looked at any new gas cans in the last decade or so? They are sealed / unvented, and don't outgas.

Any gas cans in the last decade or so are fully sealed and aren't likely to leak.

Yes, I keep my fuel cans (gas and diesel) along with spare LP tanks in a little shelter with a tarp (silver side out to reflect sun) covering the open side.
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