Kitchen range-switching from gas to electric 240v ?

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When I lived in "upstate" NY (Poughkeepsie area), the only people with gas were within the actual city limits. Homes in the towns around and a good chunk of the city, used oil heat. There was very little gas in VT until recently and it's not available here in AL, within the city limits. At least none of the homes we looked at have gas heat. I really doubt that even half the population has natural gas available.
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We don't have NG here in upstate NY, about 20 minutes from Albany, 5 minutes outside of town. I'm in the boonies, but certainly not WAY out. They sent out a survey (supposedly 25,000 copies) about 10 years ago and they said only 5 people (myself included) wanted NG. They didn't say how many bothered to return the survey, however.
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About ten years ago Vermont Gas went around and asked how many on our street (maybe 20 houses) wanted gas. As it worked out, the only money out of my pocket was $50 to have a clean-out installed in the chimney (should have been there) and $12/mo for the burner rental. I hate oil heat, so sure! The gas company paid for all installation costs, and even came back that spring and re-seeded the lawn. Only one family on the street refused.
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

I love oil heat, or at least I did when I was in the northeast. No reliance on any outside utility during nasty storms, 300 gal of heat and generator fuel on site and ready at all times. That works out to the ability to operate for at least two full weeks (more if the tank is near full at the start) without any issues during one of the northeast's killer ice storms.
Granted nat gas service doesn't have an outage very often, but it does have outages, where oil never has outages. Nat gas also blows up at least one home a month, while oil has never blown up a home.
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Pete C. wrote:

Best hope your tank is always near-full then. If there is a massive sustained electric outage for the region, you won't be getting any refills, once your local supplier empties his tanks, assuming HE has a backup generator.
As to NG blowups- simple housekeeping reduces the accidental explosion risk to near-zero. Compare that to the massive cleanup costs from even a minor tank leak (assuming the local authorities find out.) I think the odds favor NG by a wide margin.
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

I never ran into such an issue, the region just wasn't likely to experience anything that would take more than a week to recover from. If I were in a higher risk area I would have simply added a second 300gal tank (max 600gal per fire rated space). I also had a 55gal primary tank for the generator and only switched to drawing from the big tank if that 55 was getting low.

Ask the folks killed in those nat gas explosions. As for leaks, secondary containment for indoor tanks is pretty trivial, and the containment only need to match the largest individual tank, so for two 300gal tanks, you only need 300gal worth of containment which equates to only a foot or so dam around the tanks.
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You still need electricity to run the furnace. Gas isn't any more of a problem.
I absolutely *hated* it. I had all sorts of reliability issues in one house (out of heat for three days, once, with all the niceties like frozen pipes). The other wasn't perfect, but better. It stinks, too.

You've been reading the funny papers again. Try spilling a tank of oil and get back to me.
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

You missed the "heat and generator fuel". I also have a diesel generator. #2 heating oil and #2 diesel are the same thing, the only difference being the red dye and lack of transportation fuel taxes. It is 100% legal to run a generator off the untaxed fuel. Yes, the current heating oil is not ULSD, but that doesn't matter for an older diesel generator.

If you were without heat, you should have been draining the pipes. Not draining the pipes when you know they are likely to freeze is just lazy since draining them is not much work.

I've been reading the reports of residential gas explosions that show up pretty much monthly. Do a search on any news site or even google and you'll find a ton of them. As for oil leaks, it's called secondary containment, it is not a big deal, and again it wont blow up your house and kill you.
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Pete C. wrote:

Do you drive a car, or ride in them? Your chance of injury there is WAY higher. This fear is just unrealistic.
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Bob F wrote:

Yes, I do drive / ride in vehicles, as there is not a viable alternative as there is with residential nat. gas. I also always wear a seat belt. At home, for the LP cooktop of my range, I have a gas detector nearby. I find it rather sad that gas detectors are standard equipment in all RVs, yet few people have them at home.

It is very realistic, just search the news reports of all the residential gas explosions. If you have gas service at home you should at the very least have a gas detector in your home. Ideally the gas detector should be linked to a shutoff valve so it can stop a leak even if you are not home. RV gas detectors are available with shutoff valves now.
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Pete C. wrote:

It would be a waste of my time. I'm just not interested.
You do know that you smell natural gas way before it reaches dangerous levels?
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Bob F wrote:

If you are sound asleep, away from home, or the leak is in a closed room, the methyl mercaptan won't help you. An gas detector with a shutoff valve will.
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Pete C. wrote:

Secondary containment doesn't work for buried tanks, still dirt-common around here. When those leak, cleanup is an expensive PITA.
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Never had a buried tank, only the 275 or 300 gal in the basement.
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On 5/15/2010 12:18 AM, Phil wrote:

We just made decision to repair our 15 year old electric range rather than buy new. As with your gas stove, it was the electrical control panel that malfunctioned. New stoves are expensive. Wife is happy with repair.
My wife likes electric but I prefer gas but we had no choice years ago as gas company was not taking new customers. If you convert, as others say, you will need to rewire and probably upgrade your electrical panel too. Since you most likely use gas for heat and hot water you might as well continue to use it for the stove.
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Many factors come with that decision. If you are a serious cook, stoves are expensive and worth the cost for better features and better cooking oven.
The controls panel can be expensive by itself, plus a service call of $100 or more. A low end range can be had as low as $400 or so for the base models. If all you do if fry an egg for breakfast and make mac'n'cheese for dinner, it is a great value. If you want superior results from the oven and high powered burners, expect to pay $2000+.
I was under the impression that an oven was merely a hot box to cook in. I was pleasantly surprised when we started roasting in out Bertazzoni range and everything came out so much better than our old range.
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On 5/15/2010 8:41 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hate to say that our repair was close to cost of a new low end range but new would have been about 3X. Wife also got a new cal rod to replace sagging old one.
A few months ago we went through same choice with broken dishwasher but in this case, decided to replace it as there were a lot of other parts that were aging unlike the range where all important parts were replaced.
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Phil wrote:

Why would you want to convert from gas to electric? As far as I can tell, there is NO advantage in so doing and you have to give up several plusses.
* Electric is more expensive heat * You do not have the range of temperatures (gas can get MUCH hotter) * With electric, you do not have the gradations of temperature you do with gas (although, Low, Medium, High may be enough for you) * Gas heats up quicker and cools down faster than electric * You can't burn the pin-feathers off a freshly-plucked chicken with electric
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On top of that, why would he consider replacing the range instead of repairing it?
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Probably the same reason we did not repair ours. The cost of repair get high depending on what is needed. Cost of repair can equal the cost of a new low end range. New stoves have better features and can cook better in many cases. The convection oven on the new range is far superior to the old oven. Roasts come out much better, chickens are juicier, etc. It really does make a difference.
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