Kitchen musings..... shelving vs. cabinets, notions of design....

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It was quite reasonable. What in particular is your grouse?
Heh, yer gonna miss my unreasonable Englich, when they have you speaking Reasonable Spanich.... Been in HD lately?? goodgawd....

Which is usually the bleat of the simple mind, esp. overly-entitled *gangs* of simple minds.
Exactly what was so troublesome about the op? What part of "gratuitous complexity" don't y'all understand?
--
EA


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Existential Angst wrote:

Ya hablo espaol. La escribo y leo tambien.
--

dadiOH
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On 2/22/2013 12:17 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Why bother reading it? Then, why in HELL bother writing about it? :o)
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dadiOH wrote:

That's why so many just kill file the fool.
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The worst part of rading that message is that as you read it, it actually starts to become looking 'normal' and speed of reading picks up!
Communication only needs to be unique. Conculsion is reinforced by the experiences of meeting a wheelchair stricken man when we moved into our flat. MS? or something as debilitating. He greeted my "Good morning" to him with an unintelligible response of high pitched vowels only. His attending care provider 'interpreted' what he said. Within a year of continually seeing this gentleman in the lift and conversing briefly; I could actually hold a conversation discussing weather, events, etc. without the need of interpretation from his attending care provider. Learned a lot from thse interactions.
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Some people are serious about their kitchens, including renters: http://gothamist.com/2010/02/24/ikea_couple.php
Not great pubicity for Ikea.... LOL
--
EA





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Except for Elegant that could describe a submarine's galley. http://www.maritime.org/tour/cm-galley.php
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"Existential Angst" wrote in message
SNIP Awl --
Since ahm fixin up m'shop, The Wife is REALLY bitching about her kitchen.... tit for tat, I spose.... no pun intended.... but an excellent pun, eh?? LOL
Wife designed our house layout. Great.Since we moved in I had to change the following to her liking. Close off one kitchen door. Move cabinets and add more cabinets. Then lower cabinets so she could reach things better. Move front door entry closet and close off another door. This involved moving some of the hot water heat base board tubes. Adding Drawers and enclosed shelving in entry way to attached garage. Make a TV and audio electronic cabinet. Built a custom computer table. Good thing I like to do these things. Some day I MAY get to fixing up my shop. WW
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clipped

I had one kitchen that was quite large but had very little cabinet space. I was also buying antiques at the time and had a 50" round oak table, a bakers cabinet (sans flour sifter) with bin drawers and a pie safe. I used decorated tins for storing food stuff; they were cheap and sturdy. Glass cannisters (Walmart still carries the same style), and glass jars with plastic seals for stuff like beans, rice. Food makes a decent display theme and I like stuff at hand. That said, I would never use open shelves in a kitchen unless it was for something used daily...too dusty and greasy.

I've never been a fan of granite...good old practical Formica is fine. One mistake, in choosing a stone-pattern Formica was that it was hard to tell when there were crumbs on it. Good disguise :o)

Anodized alum would probably scratch. Glass would be insane for countertops. Out of necessity, we used it for backsplash above our cooktop and I loved it...pressed pattern glass with the smooth side out was super easy to clean, and solid laminate behind it. Could put any pattern of laminate or ?wallpaper, or colored glass. No tile grout for me. The backsplash was sealed all around so no gunk or steam behind it...

I have suddenly, in my old age, craved simplicity...not a lot of decoration, smooth front cabinets that are easy to clean and DURABLE. My cupboards are never arranged so I would want the contents visible. If I had elegant dishes and glassware, and loads of space, maybe.

A lot depends on how you use the kitchen...cook three meals a day for a family, eat out a lot, gourmet cooking, entertain a lot and want the company in kitchen whilst cooking?
My present kitchen is small but very well organized and easy to work in. I have crocks on the counter for utensils and measuring spoons and stuff. Corner lazy susan is a must. Window above sink, very bright during day but lousy lighting at night...hate cfl bulbs.
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On Thu, 21 Feb 2013 08:10:46 -0500, Existential Angst wrote:

Our kitchen counters are all tile. If we're holding a hot pot and we say "I need to put this thing down NOW!!! WTF can I put this thing?" the answer is always "anywhere that's flat". And I mean anywhere in the whole kitchen, because the whole kitchen counter is tile.
You cannot imagine the convenience of that until you've lived it. That's one thing that stone would give you. I'd suggest that if you use glass, use tempered glass and test a sheet of it with a pot roast fresh from the oven. I would be suspicious of aluminum -- it'd spread the heat both down into the underlying glue and across the counter to whatever is close by (like, say, your hand).
The tile is patterned, but it's much less aggressive than granite, and it's light colored. It's also textured, which is a pain if you're kneading bread -- marble would solve that problem, though, and still provide the "everywhere is a hot pad" goodness.
--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
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On 2/21/2013 10:30 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:

i used granite tiles set abutting. grout is a minimal 1/16" or less.
i wouldn't use tempered glass, unless it was 1" thick or more. at that thickness, you're looking at granite costs and weight.
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In the winter I cook on the woodstove in the shop. "anywhere that's flat" for hot pans is the milling machine table.
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On Thu, 21 Feb 2013 08:10:46 -0500, "Existential Angst"

It's too bad you can't write worth crap.
<illiterate rant snipped>
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You have a shop. Build your cupboards. Look around. There will be someone in the area making custom doors. The boxes are easy.
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