Kitchen Fluorescent Light Replacement?

Our kitchen lights are a bit on the old side (late 1980s) and consist of three 48 inch fixtures with two 27 watt bulbs (1 inch diameter) in each. Im in the process of replacing all of the bulbs right now and am having a problem and hope one of you will be able to give me some guidance. (Ive done this before, and not experienced this, so am puzzled about why its happening this time.)
I can put one of the two bulbs in each light fixture, but when I try to put the second one in, I cant get the bulb to turn/rotate properly into the bi-pin lampholder. For some reason, the bulb does not seem to go all the way up into the lampholder; the edge of the tube remains about 1/8th inch below the bottom of the lampholder on one end, and no matter how I try to get it in the proper position, I just cant. Ive thought about trying some kind of lube, like graphite or Teflon spray, but dont know if thats a wise idea.
Have any of you had a similar problem? If so, how did you solve it?
Thanks for your advice.
Lee
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 16:42:00 -0800 (PST), Lee

I have not had that problem, but are you aware that there is a newer type of fixtures and bulbs? I can't remember the name right now, but they use slightly smaller-diameter lamps, and have a number of advantages, such as more efficient, quieter, and work better in the cold.
Just a thought.
--
croy

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Just had 6 of them installed in my basement. Pretty nice looking.
I haven't had to change a bulb yet.
--
Dan Espen

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Wear glasses if you need them. Make sure to look at what's going on at each end of the bulb. Guide each end into the slots correctly.
Push straight in until you hear or feel it bottoming. The second pin should disappear into the opening. Then turn.
Just had the same problem a while ago. That's how I solved it.
I don't know about lubrication.
--
Dan Espen

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I take a sharpie black marker. I mark the side of the bulb, at each of the four pins. That way I know which direction the bulb is turned. Makes a BIG difference, for me.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Wear glasses if you need them. Make sure to look at what's going on at each end of the bulb. Guide each end into the slots correctly.
Push straight in until you hear or feel it bottoming. The second pin should disappear into the opening. Then turn.
Just had the same problem a while ago. That's how I solved it.
I don't know about lubrication.
--
Dan Espen



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There are at least two types opf sockets. One type, the bulb goes all the way into the socket, then rotatesn90. THe second type goes in part way, and then rotates about 45 to seat all the way. you need to see the tytpe of socket and then figure out how to put the bulb in.
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Interesting.
So, the difference should be obvious based on the distance between the prongs.
Close together, push straight in.
Wider (like a quarter circle?) push in then rotate.
--
Dan Espen

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No, same distance. Same lamp. One socket looks like a circle with a slot through the middle. The lamp goes straight into the slot and is then twisted 90degrees into the circle. The other type of socket looks more like a triangle with the out edges rounded out. The prongs go at a slight angle into the corner of the triangle. The bulb is then twisted until the other pin is at the other corner of the triangle.
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On 3/2/2012 8:38 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

There is an index mark on the lamp end, usually a little flat square indent on the aluminum cap between the pins. You can use the mark to tell the position of the pins when the tube is in the socket.
TDD
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Our kitchen lights are a bit on the old side (late 1980's) and consist of three 48 inch fixtures with two 27 watt bulbs (1 inch diameter) in each. I'm in the process of replacing all of the bulbs right now and am having a problem and hope one of you will be able to give me some guidance. (I've done this before, and not experienced this, so am puzzled about why it's happening this time.)
I can put one of the two bulbs in each light fixture, but when I try to put the second one in, I can't get the bulb to turn/rotate properly into the bi-pin lampholder. For some reason, the bulb does not seem to go all the way up into the lampholder; the edge of the tube remains about 1/8th inch below the bottom of the lampholder on one end, and no matter how I try to get it in the proper position, I just can't. I've thought about trying some kind of lube, like graphite or Teflon spray, but don't know if that's a wise idea.
Have any of you had a similar problem? If so, how did you solve it?
Thanks for your advice.
Lee
Check to see if the pin(s) on your problem lamp are a bit too long. It just may be a small fraction of an inch. Measure the problem lamp against the lamp that came out of the socket if you can.
The socket set may have been mounted just a little too close together in the fixture.
By the way, those standard lamps (T12 types) are on their way out. You can convert your fixture to the newer and more efficient T8 types by changing the ballast and installing T8 lamps -- no need to change the fixture or the lamp sockets although a socket change is a good idea if the fixture is more than 10-15 years old. There are ballast upgrade kits available with the new ballast and new sockets already wired together. Just mount them in the fixture and connect the ballast to the incoming power.
Tomsic
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We had similar lights in our 25 year old kitchen. I just swapped the fixures with new T8 types (including ballast and tubes).
It was quick and easy. The lights are much more efficient and we lost the horrible humming noises. Not an expensive project.
I'd do it again in a heartbeat.
--
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Thanks to all of you for your suggestions. I ended up taking two of the three fixtures down from the ceiling, putting the bulbs in, connecting via a temporary plug and checking to make sure they were working. Following that, I put them back up with new butterfly bolts, reconnecting the power and grounds and then, with great difficulty replacing the fixture cover between the bulbs and the base (with difficulty and gymnastics) and waa-laa, they worked. The reason I had to take them down is that one of my shoulders has some limitations which makes overhead work somewhat limited. I appreciate the time all of you have taken to provide suggestions for solving my problem. Lee
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On 3/2/2012 7:42 PM, Lee wrote:

Yah, bipin fluorescent bulbs are evil.
That said, they are a little easier to replace if you put a very light coating of dielectric grease on the pins.
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