Kitchen floors suggestions ?(cork, vinal, wood, laminate wood)

Currently I have ceramic tile and my feet hurt; I am certain I'm developing heal spurs because of walking without shoes on this solid tile that is afixed to cement below (house is right on the slab-no subflooring;thank you cambridge homes- frickin morons)
To add some bounce to the floor but keep it resitant from spills and stains, what options do i have?
Wood: Wood is susceptable to water. Maybe less if I finish it with one thick layer of polyurathane, but reasonable to walk on
Laminate wood (pergo) Laminate is even more so acceptable by design. The water will go right in between each board. Can be very comfortable in floating floor design
Cork Cork is supposed to be really comfortable to walk on, good insulator, but what happens if I spill a glass of water (will I end up with a speed bump because it absorbs the water?
Vinal: Durable, but not much of a cushion. I would almost have to create a some kind of subfloor to make it more comfortable to walk on.
C_kubie
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It might be easier/cheaper to find a good pair of cushioned shoes. We have two rooms carpeted over concrete and my slippers are much better than shoes for that "cushy" feeling on the feet.
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Ron
Port Dover Ontario
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On 2 Dec 2003 07:13:14 -0800, c snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (c_kubie) wrote:

Cork flooring is extremely durable, and has no special problems with water - it's basically water proof - and even more so after being sealed, finished and waxed. You'll also like the fact that when you drop a dish or a glass, it bounces!
BB
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biary bill is a retard! trust me dial up hacker On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:05:03 +0000, BinaryBillTheSailor wrote:

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Cork does look like the best way to go.
But with all the underlayment optionns, then the flooring would go
1. finish Cork flooring ($3 - $5 sq/ft) 2 3mm or 5mm cork underlayment (.50 - $1 sq/ft) 3 moisure barrier film ??
And this stuff isnt cheap either. Is online stores cheaper? Or should I look for certain stores (located in NW suburbs of IL)
C_kubie
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We're putting in a floating click together cork floor. It was CDN$5.75 /sq ft at Home Depot for the pattern we wanted. Rona (don't know if there is Rona in the U.S.) also carries cork now the same price range. This is about US$3.50-$4 per sq ft.

There is no underlayment involved for our brand of flooring (Natur by Quickstyle), unless you install it on below grade concrete which requires a vapour barrier. The flooring can go on right top of ceramic tile, lino, vinyl flooring, plywood subfloor, etc.

Like I said above, no moisture barrier is required unless you are installing directly on below grade concrete.
Hope this helps.
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I'm right on a slab and i am above grade, but i dont trust the concrete. It is probably a waste but for $30 for 200sq/ft.. I spend it for piece of mind
Also, I was reading that cork may crack if installed above heating ducts in cement floor/subfoor. Cracks can install when over 84 degrees.
http://www.diyflooring.com/inst_165/installation.html
very last line on the install instructions..
Anyone ever heard of this?
c_kubie
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In your first post it just seemed like you were concerned about the price. If $30 is in your budget, go for it.

Well it doesn't say above heating ducts, it says if you have under floor heating. From the web site:
"If the room in which the panels are to be installed has under floor heating, the surface must not exceed 82.4 degrees. Under-floor heating can lead to the formation of cracks in the cork during long heating periods."
Thus if you don't have under floor heating you don't have to worry about it. If you do, don't exceed that temperature. That's 28 degrees Celsius and I read on another site that 26 degrees Celsius is the usual temperature of underfloor heating.
It's possible it also depends on the cork manufacturer. If you have underfloor heating check with the cork's manufacturer before you purchase it to verify the maximum temperature it can withstand.

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I just read the installation instructions on our cork and I should make a correction. Ours say that you should put a 6-8 mil vapour barrier over ANY concrete whether you are below or on grade. In fact, if you don't, your warranty is void. Sorry for the misinformation, I had previously thought it was only if you are below grade.
Also, our flooring also has the warning about underfloor heating above 28 degrees Celsius. It also says though that keeping it at that temperature would be quite uncomfortable due to the heat maintenance properties of the cork.
blue wrote:

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c_kubie wrote:

What you put on the floor has nothing to do with heel spurs. See a good foot doctor.
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c_kubie wrote:

Wouldn't be a lot less expensive and a lot less hassle just to wear some shoes? Perhaps something easy to slip on and off with lots of cushion like "flip-flops" would work while in the kitchen.
Michael
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great for kitchens. 3 coats would be minimum for durability though.

don't care for the crap! wouldn't even put it in my dog house.

this is an exceptional choice for a kitchen floor and very durable.

some vinyl is very durable and makes a nice floor if your kitchen is not too wide (so there are no seams) seams ruin a vinyl floor.
Final Comment: in your current situation I would prefer cork (they also can be glued to the concrete).
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