Kitchen faucet replacement

The kitchen sink in my apartment has what I believe is an off-brand clone of a Delta single handle faucet. There's not a name or marking on it anywhere, and I can't believe Delta would produce a faucet without at least a small brand indication. Anyway...that's not the issue, at least not entirely.
A week ago, I found a pond under the sink. I thought it was leaking from where the flexible hot water supply tube meets the faucet. The apartment's maintenance guy felt that leakage from around the faucet neck was the culprit, due to worn O-rings, and that the deck gasket was old enough that it allowed the water to seep underneath. He was right. He claims to have rebuilt it. He *did* solve the original problem, but created another: The water cannot be shut off now - the faucet leaks constantly, much more than a drip sometimes. He's been back 3 times to fix it, to no avail. Silly. I suspect that if the faucet's a clone, there's no such thing as a rebuild kit that'll work correctly.
When I owned a home, I rebuilt this type of faucet several times. There was never a problem afterward. It always worked. I'm getting tired of the nonsense here. For reasons I won't go into here, I could replace the entire faucet myself and get away with deducting the cost from the next rent check. But, I want to do the job in what we'd all consider "the right amount of time", as opposed to those jobs which should take X hours, but which are full of surprises and end up taking (X * 1000) hours. I believe the variable in this case is the flexible supply tubes. The last time I installed a faucet (Delta, 10 years ago), the tubes connected via compression fittings. It worked, but I wasn't impressed with the idea. Here in my apt, I've followed those tubes with my hand and they seem to meet up with another hex-shaped fitting attached to the little pipes that are part of the faucet. The question: What is the likelihood that I'm dealing with nice, easy threaded fitting?
A) High probability B) 50/50 C) If you want to go fishing this weekend, the chances are ZIP and you'll need an acetylene torch.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

/snip/
Final answer: A. If you are lucky you can remove the faucet with the compression-fitted extension tubing attached. Otherwise, use an open-end wrench to hold the (upper) hex-shaped fitting on the tube directly connected to the faucet while you use another open-end wrench to unscrew (counter-clockwise) the extension tube. Replace the extension tubes when you replace the faucet and avoid a bunch of headaches. I like the short stainless steel hoses that the big box stores sell for this purpose.
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