kitchen faucet prob: no water

hello, I got up this morning to fill up the coffee pot and my kitchen sink faucet isn't working. Both hot and cold open full and no water. The upstairs and down stairs toilets work as does the sink in the bathroom and shower. The laundry tub is working also. Not sure what the cause is. Is the kitchen faucet itself possibly the problem? It looks like there is a little water at the base of the faucet when i turn on the faucet and jiggle it. There havn't been any pipes turned off in the house. The kitchen faucet is old and not in great shape.
Any help appreciated Steve
--




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Could be the filter screen in the faucet spout is clogged with deposits. I had this happen to me years ago and was surprised to learn that a clogged filter screen can actually stop the water flow. Remove your filter screen and see if you have water then. Des

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my 2 cents wrote:

If there's a aereator/strainer at the end of the spout, have you unscrewed it to see if it's clogged up with junk?
Let us know what you find...
Good Luck,
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
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Did it freeze?
RB
my 2 cents wrote:

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I ruled out freezing because all of the other taps in the house work. IS it possible that one tap freezes and the other s don't? It is very cold here right now -22 cel. How can i check the copper pipes go down into the basement and are covered by dry wall. thanx

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If the pipes feeding this sink run in an outside wall they can freeze. Be cautious because if they did freeze, and if a pipe split, then when the ice plug melts you'll be looking at a flood. Good luck.
RB
my 2 cents wrote:

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It's difficult to check since the pipes are in a closed space but at -22 C (it's colder than that here now) it will happen. My money is on frozen pipes. I've been there.
RB
my 2 cents wrote:

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I unscrewed the nozzle and there is still nothing?? Should i disconnect the whole faucet?? thanks Steve

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To follow-up on the previous question re: freezing. Where are you located? How cold is it? Do the pipes pass through unheated space? Lots of people have had frozen pipes in the last few days.
--
Peace,
BobJ

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I just saw your previous reply. Is your kitchen sink along an exterior wall? It is certainly possible that your kitchen sink pipes have frozen and not others. If you have no access to the pipes, you are probably better off just waiting until it gets warmer, instead of trying to troubleshoot a problem that may be temperature based. Make sure your kitchen faucet is closed (or better yet, open just a tiny drip) so that you don't get a flood overflowing the sink when the pipe finally melts.
If your other pipes also pass through areas that might freeze, I would suggest turning all your faucets (both hot and cold) on just a bit. Even a tiny trickle should prevent them from freezing.
For the toilet, this is my approach. Take a piece of thin string and tie it around the overflow pipe to hold it in place. Place a sinker on the other end of the string. Lift the flapper and put the string under the flapper. This should allow water to drip out very slowly. When the tank level drops enough (probably every minute or two), the water will come on to refill the tank, which will maintain your flow. The sinker will keep the string from floating up when you flush the toilet, the loop around the overflow will prevent the sinker and string going down the outflow from the tank.
--
Peace,
BobJ

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Coincidentally my kitchen faucet is the only one that is along an exterior wall. I thought of freezing but then i figured if all other water sources are fine it must be something else. Does this mean my house is poorly insulated. It's older, built 1950, clapboard siding. I guess i'll have to wait it's supposed to get warmer Sunday. thanx

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Not necessarily poorly insulated but the water pipes are probably exposed to some freezing temperatures. The pipes are probably on the "cold" side of the insulation. If you can expose those pipes then do it. Do NOT use a propane torch to heat the pipes up - I'll probably see you on the news tonight if you do.
Is there any evidence of water leakage? Does you water meter run when everything else is off? If it does then the pipe(s) may have burst/cracked.

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The pipes were frozen. I had to take a floor board out under the sink and thaw the pipes. There was a major draft coming through so i stuck some fibreglass insulation. That alleviated the draft prob. Hopefully there won't be any mor freezing. cheers

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Glad it worked out for you.
--
Peace,
BobJ

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Not necessarily poorly insulated but the water pipes are probably exposed to some freezing temperatures. The pipes are probably on the "cold" side of the insulation. If you can expose those pipes then do it. Do NOT use a propane torch to heat the pipes up - I'll probably see you on the news tonight if you do.
Is there any evidence of water leakage? Does you water meter run when everything else is off? If it does then the pipe(s) may have burst/cracked.

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