Kitchen drain pipe - snake goes through easily, but not water?

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I'm baffled. Kitchen sink backed up yesterday, so I removed the kitchen disposal to snake the pipe. I also disconnected the pipe in the basement (where I have a rubber boot connector to plastic pipe that's fortunately runs over my wash basin). So I've got a run of only about 6 or 7 feet of pipe that I snaked. Snaking went easy, with the cable end coming out the end of the pipe with very little gunk. So, I pour water down the pipe under the sink and it just trickles out in the basement! I've snaked it 3 more times, and still the water flow out the end of the pipe in the basement is about a quart every 10 minutes. Any ideas?
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On 1/7/2011 6:24 PM, Pete wrote:

BTW, I also poured a pint of Pequa drain opener in the pipe, which also trickled out at the same rate. I let it sit for 2 or 3 hours, but still the same results.
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Ventilation?
-C-
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On 1/7/2011 6:27 PM, Country wrote:

and behind cabinet a foot or so and down from there. The bathroom's right above the kitchen, so it's possible there's a vent pipe that ties to the bathroom. Just guessing.
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On 1/7/2011 6:49 PM, Pete wrote:

Showing my ignorance here again, but even if there was no vent pipe, I don't understand how that could be a factor in this case. I've removed the p-trap. I would think that with the pipe under the sink wide open, lack of a vent pipe wouldn't impede the water flow.
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A flat wire snake just poking a hole through gunk might end up with the results you describe. A typical spiral wire snake shouldn't. Have you snaked while the drain piping is loaded with water, or poked a hose running with water while pausing your snaking?
Seems odd to me. You're right about venting. If the drain is open it's to the kitchen, it's vented. When you say the snake came out of the end, you mean in the basement, right?
--Vic
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On 1/7/2011 7:55 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Yes, the snake came out in the basement. It's a cable snake with a half inch spiral wire end. I've snaked it with water in it. In fact, I had the snake all the way through to the basement and filled the pipe at the same time (with an inverted elbow piece). I pulled the snake back out, and the water still drizzle out in the basement. I'm thinking gremlins.
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Two things I can think of:
1) That 1/2" spiral isn't big enough for your clog. A guy I used to know taught me a little trick: Loosely fasten a piece of wire to the spiral. As you spin the spiral, the wire flies outwards and acts as a sort of roto- rooter, dislodging more gunk than the spiral does alone. The faster you spin the spiral, the better the wire works.
2) Maybe you need a better drain-opener. I see that Pequa's drain-opener is potassium hydroxide. This may not be as effective as lye (sodium hydroxide). Drano (for one) is lye-based, and properly used, is an excellent gunk-decomposer. Drano is septic-safe.
--
Tegger

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org:

Attach some fairly stiff wire to the end of the snake once you get it coming out in the basement, bend the wire so it is at least 1/2 the diameter of the pipe, and then fill the pipe with water and spin the snake while pulling it back up, keep the water filled. That way, as you come back up and dislodge anything, it is free from that point down to the basement end. What you are doing may loosen something, but then it clogs back up. My way will give whatever is clogging the pipe an open pathway from the clog point into the basement.
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I like that idea. He's got access from both ends of the clog, so he might as well take advantage of it.
--
Tegger

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?

At least try snaking up from the basement. It may be enough to go at a different angle to grab the clog.
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On 1/7/2011 9:22 PM, Tegger wrote:

OK, I poured some more of the drain cleaner last night. This morning I snaked again and a bit of gunk came out. I tried attaching some wire and backing out the snake. More gunk came out, but the wire twirled off the spiral cable wire. So I reattached some more wire and went back down with snake - a lot of gunk came out. I then flushed the pipe again with a sinkful of hot water and lots of Dawn, and that really did it. Lots of crud, and free flowing water!
I noticed in the gunk there were a number of greasy black flaps. My suspicion at this point is that the flaps were partially stuck to the walls of the pipe, but the unstuck sections blocked the smooth flow of water. The snake probably got through them OK, but once the snake was removed, the flaps and any other grease still there slowed the flow to a trickle.
Anyway, all is well, and I thank everyone for their suggestions.
Now, prevention. Besides limiting the grease, and using cold water when grease is flushed, are there any drain cleaners that are particularly effective in maintaining clean, less greasy pipes?
Thanks, Pete
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On 1/8/2011 10:26 AM, Pete wrote:

If I rinse grease down the drain, I run hot water before and after. That is only to rinse pans/dishes. Larger amounts, I pour into a jar or can and dispose of that into the trash. Only clogs I have had in years and years have been hairballs in bathroom and veggie peels I fed through the disposal in large amounts. I don't and won't use Drano or similar ... too nasty to keep around and no reason to create a clog that is subject to Drano clearing it :o)
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Hey! Success is sweet.

I find regular application of Drano (or other preparation containing sodium hydroxide) to be particularly effective. I use the Gel stuff, because it sticks around longer.
--
Tegger

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Wow! This becomes my night to disagree with two posters on the same night.
Again, no offense intended.
Emulsify your grease with soap and cold water before sending it down the drain. The clots come where the pipe cools enough to allow it. Cold water doesn't cool. The suspended grease will pass to the sewer.
Just think about it. Think and understand.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
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On Sat, 8 Jan 2011 17:37:38 -0500, "Colbyt"

What are all these greasy black flaps? What are they from? I don't put black flaps down my drain. I don't even have any to put.
And how do they get by the garbage disposal? In other words, how big are they, what are they, and how do you get them?

You're velcome.

I'm thinkin' but I don't understand. Seems to me in cold water they are at least as likely to pile up behind other clumps of grease.
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to clear grease pour boiling water down drains, it liquifies the grease and moves it along.......
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I use a 3-gallon sprinkling can with nozzle removed. Fill with water, bring to boiling on stove. I pour some detergent (TSP, ...) down the drain, then all of the hot water. Once every 4-8 weeks keeps my kitchen drain open.
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When you start with a clean open line the cold water carries the sludge to the city sewer and it does not collect at the cool point of the line. Modern plastic pipes are much more forgiving than the old iron ones. Flushing a line by filling the sink before pulling the plug at least once a week also helps. It is a matter of volume. Soap scum can build up over time in a half bath because no one ever fills the bowl before draining.
--
Colbyt
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I noticed something like that I'm my kitchen pipe once. I was under the impression that they were some sort of fungal growths, like those disk-like fungi that grow on trees.
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