kitchen circuits 15 amp vs 20 amp outlets

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I am redoing my kitchen. All of the duplex outlets are on two 20 amp 12 awg wire breakers. However...all of the old outlets are rated for 15 amp circuits ? I have come across this in kitchens many times before.
Can you use duplexes rated for 15 amps in the kitchen with 20 amp breakers...fed by 12 awg wires ? Is this a common practice and OK via NEC...or should you use the 20 amp duplexes with the horizontal little plug fitting on the receptacles ?
Thanks, TR
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tr wrote:

Personally I would replace them with 20amp outlets, good ones, not the 37 contractor specials. Use the screw clamp terminals not the stab connects. I am really fuzzy about it, but as I recall it is OK to use the 15amp outlets, but I just would not do it so I am not really sure.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Yes, 15A receptacles on a 20A circuit is perfectly fine. You may not put a *single* 15A receptacle on a 20A circuit.

In the kitchen, maybe. I'd go for better outlets there, but I don't think I'd bother with 20A outlets.

I agree 100%. I *never* use the stabs. I do like the ones where the screw clamps the wire though. Almost as quick as the stabs but as secure as a wire properly fastened by the screw.

It's fine. 15A outlets are rated for 20A feed through.
-- Keith
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If these are counter top or anywhere near sink, they should be 20A GFI. If for fridge or dishwasher, dedicated 20A. If you are redoing kitchen, you probably want to look at adding circuits/ receptacles. Think through what you want before you start, this is the time to upgrade elec circuits if needed.
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For fridge and other essentials, I prefer to put an often used light on the same circuit so I will be aware when the breaker trips before the frozen food thaws.
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The NEC prohibits installing lights on kitchen outlet circuits, other than ones plugged into the outlets
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On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 16:48:55 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Isn't that just the countertop outlets?
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No, it's any outlet connected to the two or more required small appliance branch circuits.
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this)@optonline.net> wrote:

I don't think that's correct -- do you have a Code cite for it? I see where the Code prohibits other *outlets* on those circuits (e.g. in other rooms), but I don't see a prohibition against lighting.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Here's all I could find . from the 2000 IRC
E3603.2 Kitchen and dining area receptacles.A minimum of
two 20-ampere-rated branch circuits shall be provided to serve
receptacles located in the kitchen, pantry, breakfast area and
dining area. The kitchen countertop receptacles shall be served
by a minimum of two 20-ampere-rated branch circuits, either
or both of which shall also be permitted to supply other receptacle
outlets in the kitchen, pantry, breakfast area and dining area.
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Steve Barker
Paola, KS
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You don't consider lighting outlets as "other outlets"?
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this)@optonline.net> wrote:

I don't consider a light *fixture* (e.g. a ceiling light) as an outlet, and neither does the Code.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I don't consider a light *fixture* (e.g. a ceiling light) as an outlet, and neither does the Code
I think if that were the case, they wouldn't use specific terms like "receptacle outlets" and "outlets"
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>>> You don't consider lighting outlets as "other outlets"? >> I don't consider a light *fixture* (e.g. a ceiling light) as an outlet, >> and >> neither does the Code. >>> RBM wrote: > I don't consider a light *fixture* (e.g. a ceiling light) as an > outlet, and neither does the Code > > I think if that were the case, they wouldn't use specific terms like > "receptacle outlets" and "outlets" >
"Lighting Outlet. An outlet intended for the direct connection of a lamp-holder, a luminaire (lighting fixture), or a pendant cord terminating in a lamp-holder.
Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment. ["An example is a lighting outlet or a receptacle outlet." Handbook Commentary]
Power Outlet. An enclosed assembly that may include receptacles, circuit breakers, fuse-holders, fused switches, buses, and watt-hour meter mounting means; intended to supply and control power to mobile homes, recreational vehicles, park trailers, or boats or to serve as a means for distributing power required to operate mobile or temporarily installed equipment.
Receptacle Outlet. An outlet where one or more receptacles are installed." Copyright 2002 National Fire Protection Association
The quoted material above is from the National Electric Code. Would you mind sharing which code you were referring to.
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Tom Horne

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When the code states that the small appliance circuits can't be shared with other "outlets", by the very definition, that you point out, if you read the commentary, "outlet" includes all types of outlets
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RBM wrote:

Why do you assume that I'm arguing with you. Did I hit respond to the wrong posting?
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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I could be mistaken, but that sounds like an argument to me
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 04:00:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

It does in the 1999 codebook. "Outlet" is a term of the art that means "thing that uses electricity". The term for what you plug a cord into is "receptacle". Most of the time it's a distiction without a difference.
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Nov 2006 00:59:50 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

PMFJI, but please see 2005 NEC 210.23(A)
[QUOTE]
(A) 15- and 20-Ampere Branch Circuits. A 15- or 20-ampere branch circuit shall be permitted to supply lighting units or other utilization equipment, or a combination of both, and shall comply with 210.23(A)(1) and (A)(2).
Exception: The small appliance branch circuits, laundry branch circuits, and bathroom branch circuits required in a dwelling unit(s) by 210.11(C) (1), (C)(2), and (C)(3) shall supply only the receptacle outlets specified in that section.
[/QUOTE]
--
Seth Goodman

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Right... but since Code requires two small appliance circuits in a kitchen, a *third* outlet circuit could supply virtually any other loads as well, because that third circuit is not a "small appliance branch circuit ... required ... by 210.11(C) ..." and thus not subject to that restriction.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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