KILZ And Ceiling Water Stains ?

Hello,
A few fairly light to medium orange water stains have developed on our white bathroom ceiling due to water dam. The typical problem.
A bit on in age now, and I would like to have to re-paint the ceiling only once, if practical. It's a real job for me to do nowadays.
I know the smart way is to coat the stains with, I think I read to use shellac (?), and then a white paint. This is supposed to prevent additional bleed-thru.
Is there any product I can use that stands a good chance of doing it in one coating/step ?
What about this KILZ I've heard about ? Would that do it in a single step and prevent further bleeding thru of the stain (assuming no more water leakages) ?
I think there are also similar products under different names, perhaps ?
Any thoughts would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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On 3/4/2011 10:48 AM, Bob wrote:

My friend who used to fix such problems in Chicago, says Drylock. Once and done and water stains never bleed through. It never mentions doing this on the product (sold for cement water proofing), but it works. And works where nothing else will. Got a good bit of it here!
Jeff

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Not all water stains can be covered in one coat... It sometimes takes more than one coat of the KILZ even though it implies on the can that making the stain go away could occur in one coat...
You then have to apply at least one coat of ceiling paint to the entire ceiling area otherwise you will be able to see EXACTLY where you painted over the stains... Two coats of ceiling paint and you yourself will have a hard time finding where the stain was unless there was other damage you could use as a landmark to locate it...
~~ Evan
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On 3/4/2011 10:48 AM, Bob wrote:

Kilz is a brand name with a number of different kinds of primers. I think one of their earliest primers was shellac based, and they still make that. The shellac based primer has nasty fumes, and a water based (latex) stain-blocking primer would probably be a little easier to use. I've used both, as well as other brands. You don't need a primer that COVERS the stain, you simply need to seal it up and isolate it so that it doesn't bleed through the final paint coat. Kilz, Bullseye and other major brands make good primers. One can just prime the stained area and feather out the edges, but that sometimes can give the final paint coat a different gloss...best to coat the entire ceiling. Be sure the surface is entirely dry - in a bath, the moisture from showers can lurk for hours, so drying the ceiling with a towel prior to coating it is probably a good idea. Here is a link to Kilz website:
http://www.masterchem.com/masterchem/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid 5f90033f9ff110VgnVCM1000008a05d103RCRD
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IMO, Kiltz is krap.
Forget the Kilz and fork over the cash for the original Bins, a shellac based white stain killer. Normally covers completely in on rolled on coat. Really heavy stains may take two.
I have killed water stains, smoker stains and heavy fire smoke damage with a single coat.
Sold at Lowes for about $25 a gallon. May be at Home Depot also.
Open the windows or the alcohol base will make you high. Throw away the roller or clean with denatured alcohol.
--
Colbyt
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DITTO...
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if the drywall is damaged AT ALL, cut out and replace the areas. not only will you get a better job but this allows you to take a look and confirm all leaks are absolutely repaired/
theres nothing worse than thinking you fixed the leak, repainting the room and finding its still leaking....
take it down for a inspection you may find other things of interest....
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It's interesting how many people seem to have ignored this paragraph of your post. In a few years or decades they'll have the same line in their posts and people will ignore that too, I guess.

About that I have no thoughts. :(

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