Keyless home entry- does anyone make these specs?

One of my upcoming projects will be to replace my front door lockset. Given what technology is out there, I know what I want but I don't know if anyone makes it- if anyone knows of a manufacturer/model that does all this, please let me know.
1. keyless entry: I'd accept a fob button, but I'd really prefer a proximity sensor- so when I get within maybe 3-5 feet of the door with my hands full of groceries and my keys in my pocket, the door will unlock just because the fob is close enough to register on the sensor in the lock. I'm probably dreaming, but any solution that doesn't require using a key, or entering a combination, or using biometrics is worth considering.
2. multiple programmable combination code entry and a keypad (must allow at least 2 separate codes), with the ability to limit when each code will work- so if I have a contractor coming over to work on something, I can program a code in for them, and set it so the code will only work from 1- 5pm on the target date, and then quit working unless I program it to work again. I'd use one code as my emergency backup, so I could always get in even if I lost or broke my fob.
3, And what would be really great is if the fob was programmable, so I could also use it to replace my garage door remote- but now I'm really dreaming.
How much of this functionality can I get? Are there any vendors that sell this type of gear for DIY installations? Everything I've seen is either 100% keypad (no fob or proximity) and there are a few with fobs but no keypads.
Thanks, Keith
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Given
anyone
just
You bet, most commerical systems, ($$$$$$$) can work with a card in the wallet or id tag. These systems are a bit expensive for most home use, unless you Bill Gates.

at
Wieser's Power Bolt has the ability to have 4 codes. Maybe more I only used 4

My last home had a Chamberlin garage door opener, that I had a key pad on the outside and a 3 button remote in my truck. Button one was programed for garage door and button 2 was lock garage door, button 3 was open garage door and turn on inside light.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why would you want to make your life so immensely complex? Simplify, simplify. Think Walden. :-)
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

==================Kind of agree ... In fact I still normally do not even lock my doors.... and the keys to the cars are in the ignition ...
NOT about to tell anyone my location....BUT its true...been 20 years since a car key has came into the house or a house key has traveled in the cars..
Bob G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is nice to live in a location where you can do that. And shoot people who come sneaking around your property that are up to no good.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob G. wrote:

Hmf, One things for sure, you dont live in western Washington state. Crime here is un f**k**g believable! And the best thing is, there is no penalty for it here either:-) mu-ha,hahahaha (The libs just wring their hands and feel sorry for the criminals and thats that. for example, car theft is a "fining offense") sorry, i didnt mean to get started.... Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I live in South Seattle, between Burien, Tukwila and Seatac as a matter of fact. People get ripped off everywhere, including in rural Nebraska. When I have compared my family's experiences with my cousin family's experiences I have had less problems than them. Stop feeling sorry for yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think that in MI it's an offense to leave a car unlocked, let alone with the key in the ignition.
OTOH, I recall reading many years ago a magazine article, allegedly by a reformed car thief, whio claimed that they never touched cars that were left unlocked because there was a much better chance that the driver of an unlocked car would be back very soon.
Perce
On 07/08/05 11:42 am Bob G. tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While some car thieves might think this way, most don't. Many cars are stolen after being left unattended with the keys in the ignition. This tends to happen in colder areas, where people are tempted to leave the engine running while they "just run into the store for a second".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Clever people can lock the doors and still keep the engine running ;)
--
Free men own guns, slaves don\'t
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@access4less.net says...

And not-so-clever people can smash a window, open the door, and drive off with a vehicle for the cost of a window repair.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not with mine. Keyless remote starting.. As soon as you put foot on the brake, or try to shift gears without key in switch, it dies.. I AM afraid a thief might not look in and see that there's no key prior to trying though...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu 07 Jul 2005 08:04:46p, Keith wrote in alt.home.repair:

You clearly have too much time on your hands!
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Install a passage set. They are for bedrooms and things that don't have to be locked. They don't have a lock on them. That oughta simplify things.
No lock. No keys.
Can't get any simpler than that.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu 07 Jul 2005 11:43:28p, SteveB wrote in alt.home.repair:

Actually, they can get simpler. Install a swinging door. Then you just bust right through with an armload of grocery bags.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You might want to post this to comp.home.automation as well... lots of good folk over there. (and quite a few twits.... be wary.)
You might end up addressing the lock and keypad seperately. RFID might be ok for the key fob... I had friends who used to describe it as "mating with the door" since you'd walk up to it and wiggle your butt at it. ;) The bad thing with that is the fact that it's static. I imagine someone with a crack transmitter could just sweep through the codes. (or walk near you with a reader to steal the code that way.)
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They make radio-controlled dog-doors, with tranmitters (or maybe transponders?) that attach to the dog collar.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many companies, including mine, have door access control that have a little keyfob that you wave in front of a 'thing' that unlocks the door based on a code in the fob. The beauty of this system for companies is that they can give different people different access capabilities (e.g. employess of a certain wing might not be able to access a second wing, the computer room may only be accessable to appropriate personel, etc). I doubt these come cheap as they're marketed to companies that can amortize it over dozens or hundreds of employees-- not just a fob or two. You could also add a keypad to such a system to do what you wanted.
I'm pretty sure I've seen remote access push-button fobs for home use. I don't think anyone's gone as far as integrating these with a garage door opener.
You might want to investigate security systems with access control. They can likely do much of what you want.
-Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a Weiser Lock keypad front door lock. It can be programmed for 2 different codes, but has no clock. It also opens with a key. I bought mine at Lowes, but have noticed they no longer sell keypad locks. At that time, Lowes also sold a Weiser that opened with a remote. I've had this lock since April 1999 and have never had a problem, it is very easy to change the codes. I bought it because my son could not keep track of keys and so would never lock the door. With this he can just push a button and it locks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a Weiser Lock keypad front door lock. It can be programmed for 2 different codes, but has no clock. It also opens with a key. I bought mine at Lowes, but have noticed they no longer sell keypad locks. At that time, Lowes also sold a Weiser that opened with a remote. I've had this lock since April 1999 and have never had a problem, it is very easy to change the codes. I bought it because my son could not keep track of keys and so would never lock the door. With this he can just push a button and it locks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.