Kerosene in a plastic gasoline can

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Is it legal for a vendor to put kerosene in a plastic gasoline can? (I assume the opposite is illegal, but I don't know about this.)
Is there any other reason not to put in in one?
If after I've emptied all the kerosene and want to use it for gasoline, if there's a little bit of kerosene still in it, will that be a problem for a lawn mower or a car?
I have a spare platic can and no room for a kerosene can, and I would only need it for a few months anyhow.
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I don't know if it is a law, but gas cans are red, kero cans are blue. This avoids potential problems from mix-ups. Putting gas in a kerosene heater can be a disaster. It is legal to use a plastic can. If a slight residue is left, it will easily mix with gas and you'll never see a problem in a mower or car once diluted.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

sold in plastic containers. Personally, I prefer to keep it a gallon glass bottle on the floor, but some may consider that dangerous.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Kerosene-in-a-plastic-gasoline-can-137544-.htm MasonJoshua wrote: I have alot of knowledge with osha. One tip is plastic is not the way to got. Look into grainger or northern tools for safety cans. Yes color does matter but if your going to use plastic you might want to google the msds ratings on each chemical you put in a can and buy a roll of right to know stickers. They basically come blank and allow you to right what is in the container and the values of its stability. If you have any questions feel free to ask me at snipped-for-privacy@att.net or snipped-for-privacy@trussway.com. Regulations are hard to follow and as I learn id love to help others. Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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On Sat, 08 May 2010 01:29:06 +0000, masonjoshua_at_att_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (MasonJoshua) wrote:

Kero should go in a blue or gray can. Red is for gas. However, in a bind, you can use a red can without the kero causing the plastic to decay or melt. Gasoline is actually more destructive to plastics than kero. For example, never put gas in a styrofoam cup because the cup will melt in seconds. I have never out kero in a styrofoam cup, and would not recommend it, but I have a feeling it would not melt as quickly.
With that said, it's NOT LEGAL to put Kero in a red can, but if you must do it in an emergency, at least write KEROSENE on the can with a permanent marker, or affix some labelled paper with tape.
PS. I have a YELLOW gas can I got at an auction. Does anyone know what yellow is for? There is no label. I was going to just spray paint it red, but never done it yet.
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Yellow is for diesel fuel.
Of course, ideally, the proper color container for the proper fuel. As you said, it's wise to label the container if used in emergency for some other fuel.
A trace of kerosene won't hurt gasoline, if kerosene must be hauled in a red container.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've heard more than one person say they mixed gasoline & kerosene 50-50 back during WWII when there was gasoline rationing. Smoked a bit but no damage. In todays cars... who knows? I wouldn't want to risk it killing a bunch of sensors. But like you say, a trace amount won't hurt anything
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I believe yellow is for DIESEL FUEL
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If you were trying to escape a hurricane, it's worth a try. Kerosene used to run in some gas enginese, after the motor was warmed up. They did that at remote pump houses, years ago. Might still do. Kerosene does go stale, but more slowly than gasoline.
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On May 8, 4:03am, snipped-for-privacy@mydesk.com wrote:

The only Yellow (plastic) can we have is part of a gadget we use for vacuuming (sucking), for example, engine oil etc. from something which ether does not have or has a drain plug that can't be reached!
It has a pump arrangement which screws onto what looks like a standard filler. When operated it draws 'waste' oil int to yellow plastic container. The black plastic tubular pump looks very much like those small plastic ones for inflating an air mattress etc.
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Except that it 'sucks'!
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replying to mycomputer3, April wrote:

RED: gasoline BLUE: kerosene YELLOW: diesel
I learned this while researching if I can put kerosene into a gasoline container. I use an indoor kerosene heater to heat my home and I wanted to purchase one of those fuel pump canisters that hold about 14 gallons at a time. For some reason, the "diesel" fuel containers are a lot more expensive than the gasoline ones, so I was trying to figure out why.
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On 01/01/2015 12:44 PM, April wrote: ...

It's only the wondrous State of California thru their octopus CARB that defines the color coding. CA is large enough it then becomes a de facto standard, but there's no binding requirement anywhere than in CA.
US DOT, EPA, OSHA care not a whit about color, only the various pieces of transportation safety design, workplace and environmental for the others.
A color coding isn't a bad thing but it's not mandated other than by CA...
<http://www.arb.ca.gov/consprod/fuel-containers/pfc/pfc.htm
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replying to mycomputer3, Sunrise_2009 wrote: Yellow is for diesel
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gasoline cans in kerosene?
I don't see why it would be illegal, I think it would be a very dumb idea for a dealer to do this - the two are NOT interchangible.
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years. I don't recommend it because it is too easy to make a mistake. I did it in an emergency, and now am too cheap to do otherwise.
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Toller wrote:

They smell different.
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Are you my long lost brother? I've been searching for you for 20 years!
Maybe I'll take a marker with me, and write kerosene if the guy insists. Later I can change it to skerosene, so as not to confuse anyone.         
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Again, Red Green comes to the rescue...
Remember those things when you (me anyway) were a kid where you wrote on the film over the silver/grey backing? You pulled the film up and it erased the writing for a clean slate. Can't remember what it was called.
Just duct tape one of those to the can and change at will at the station.
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wrote:

I had that and I liked it. I don't remember the name.

Great idea. I should have though of that. When in college I had keys that were stamped on them Do Not Duplicate, I would put some paper tape around the head of the key and write "Back Door" on the paper.
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