kerosene heater?

Page 2 of 2  


Kero will go up with oil.
Your furnace is likely thermostatically controlled & you can set that as low as you like. It will shut off rather than continuing to throw off useless heat like a kero heater.
They are a safety hazard and some insurance companies don't want you to use them.
Your house will smell like Kero and be covered in a black film by spring.
They are a major PITA- you need to keep running out and buying kero. There are 2 places that sell kero in my area. One is 6 miles west, the other is 5 miles east. It never fails, that whenever I need kero for my salamander heater, the first one I go to is out of Kero-- so then I go to the other & 1/2 the time it will have some. The other 1/2 of the time I've just wasted a gallon of gas and still can't run the damn heater.

Your best bet to save fuel is to insulate your house, seal up your windows, install storm doors, and turn your thermostat down. Safer, cleaner, easier, and more bag for your buck.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I get a laugh out of people like you. As if we dont all know this stuff by now.
How about this. Everytime I'm told to insulate and save energy I do it.
In the past 10 years I added so much insulation that I only have about 25 square feet left to live in. This house was originally 1800 square feet. I added storm windows and more and more windows. I can no longer see the windows. I added weather stripping to the doors, I cant find the doors anymore. I turned off all lights and used smaller and smaller bulbs, and I can no longer see my dinner when I eat. I turned down my thermostat, from 70 to 60, then 50, then 40, 30, 20, and it would not go any lower, so I just shut off the furnace. Three days later I died from freezing. It took the coroner's office 5 days to cut thru all the insulation to get my body out of the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Be grateful that he wasn't selling you "horse hung, add three inches". You'd have had to get someone three towns away to hold your urethra so you could hang a leak.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2010 2:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Oh ha ha.
There is no need to over insulate, but most old houses have major holes in the thermal envelope. Often it is no insulation in the walls. Adding storm windows or added insulation in the attic will have little impact if you have a big heat leak elsewhere. Most people think only attic and windows, so it is important that the point is made that they may very well be pouring money down the drain by missing insulation where it really is needed.
I'm not in the trade, but I've seen enough old houses to know that any wall insulation was rare before the 60's and decent insulation wasn't common until 20 years later.
I can tell you for an absolute fact that if you have nothing in the walls your house depends on having cheap energy, and those days are long gone.
Jeff
I turned off all lights and used smaller

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only way you'll save money with a kerosene heater is if you position the heater directly in front of your furnaces thermostat.
You can use an electric heater and save money the same way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom wrote:

Wick heaters carbon up, clog and become less efficient as the wick ages. Monitor kerosene heaters ARE popular and burn clean and are vented. Propane is much better for space heating; no wicks to mess with. I'd still go with vented propane though. If you house is air tight, you could die from carbon monoxide posioning with ventless.
--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For the simple reason that kerosene has become absurdly impractical, economically.
I used to have a kerosene space heater. Worked great. Many friends up in the hills had Alladin kerosene lamps. This was when grade B kerosene was only $1.80 gal. Grade A, only a bit more.
Last time I saw kerosene, it was on sale at the local feed and grain store. It was $8.00 gal!! Who the hell can afford that? A little later, I tried selling a near new 24,000 btu kerosene htr. It cost about $150 new. I couldn't sell it for $30. Ended up tossing it. No place I currently know sells kerosene htrs. Why bother?
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2010 3:35 PM, Tom wrote:

Ever use one? I remember when folks used to say "this is great, you can't even smell it (after it burned your sense of smell out) or tell I am using it (and you could write your name on a window and had teary eyes for two hours after you left their house).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/27/2010 12:35 PM Tom spake thus:

Since I've used kerosene heaters on and off for the last 20 years or so, I'll give you the benefit of my experience.
They're good for *temporary* space heating, but with some gotchas:
o Since they emit bad stuff (CO & CO2), only use them in well-ventilated spaces. I wouldn't use it in a small, well-sealed room with all doors and windows closed.
o I would never use one unattended, either when you're not home or while you're sleeping. I only fire mine up when I'm awake and up and about.
o As others have said, kerosene isn't cheap. But the good news is that the small heaters I have use fuel pretty conservatively. I still have most of a 5-gallon can left over from last winter.
o Don't expect them to heat a large room. They're good for sort of "spot" use, like when you're sitting while reading, etc. They can take the chill off a larger room, but not bring it up to room temperature.
o You need to learn to adjust them properly. The only time they smoke, if they're adjusted right, is right after being lit before they get hot enough to turn the catalytic burner red-hot. After they're hot you need to adjust the burner so the flame doesn't go much above the screen on top. Otherwise you'll get smoke coming out.
If properly adjusted there's surprisingly little odor once they're red-hot. They're pretty efficient at fully combusting the fuel.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2010 5:13 AM LSMFT spake thus:

True; yet another reason you don't want to use them in a well-sealed space.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kerosene heaters are 100% efficient (no heat goes up the chimney). In my experience, they need annual service, new wick and so on. Might be easier to keep using your oil boiler.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Price kerosene in as many places as you can, and you will have your answer.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.