Kenmore Washer Won't Drain

We have an older Kenmore 70 Series washing machine, model 110.72770100.
A few weeks ago it randomly stopped draining. Most of the time it works fine, but maybe one load out of five the tub is still full of water when the cycle is over.
I replaced the lid switch, but the problem continued.
We also had one load when the washer actually overflowed onto the floor.
So, I replaced the timer, the water pump, and the fill valve. There were no obstructions in any of the hoses and the drive belt is in good condition.
But, occasionally it still doesn't drain and spin properly.
Any ideas what would cause this?
Thanks,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Monday, June 8, 2015 at 9:00:12 AM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

Sounds like you already replaced all the parts involved. Only obvious thing left is a loose connection somewhere in the wiring. I'd follow the wiring diagram and check all connections. If you don't find anything doing that, then I'd catch it when it's misbehaving and probe it out. All those parts must have cost quite a bit of the cost of a new machine.
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I checked the wiring and connections while I had it apart. Didn't see anything loose or damaged in any way.

We have noticed it sometimes continues to agitate when the timer is in the rinse/spin cycle. That's what made me think the timer was bad, but the new timer does the same thing.

All of the new parts, including some new leveling feet, cost about $300.
New machines cost around $600, and of course we would want to buy a matching dryer. $300 to fix the old one sounded better than $1200+ to buy new machines. :)
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On 6/8/2015 8:58 AM, HerHusband wrote:

You did everything I'd have done.
Check for corroded connections someplace. You replaced most everything electrical already, but if there is a wire to something that is not contacting properly, that will negate the other parts.
Depending on the age of the machine, unless I was sure it was fixed I'd consider replacing it rather than throw more money at it. .
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FWIW my wife has a fine ass, she does wash my undies, and she tolerates me as well. She's an awesome lady. :)
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My mom bought the set new about 30 years ago, and passed it down to me about 20 years ago. They look like new and we've had virtually no problems with them.
I always figured I would keep fixing it till it rusted out or the transmission/motor failed. There's not much to them and new parts are fairly inexpensive and widely available.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Mon, 8 Jun 2015 18:30:10 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Is this a belt drive or direct drive? (the cutover was in that time frame) On the belt drive machines there was a "wigwag" (2 solenoids on an arm that rocks back and forth). That is what switches the transmission into reverse for spin and pump out. Be sure the wires are not broken.
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Yes, it is a belt drive, and I do remember seeing the "wigwag". I didn't see any broken wires to the solenoids though. Do you know if something else can fail with the wigwag (intermittenly)?
Thanks,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Mon, 8 Jun 2015 21:16:07 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

You can get a bind in the solenoids. Watch the way it trips the transmission shifter to see what is happening. It has been about 30 years since I worked on one but I used to have several in the family that I worked on. The other thing that can happen is the belt gets old, stretches and slips. There is a removable chunk of the support that seems to have it "captive". Remove the bolt, knock out that cylinder and you can get the belt out without taking much else apart.
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Thanks for the information! I'll take a better look at it when I get the chance.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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