Kenmore dryer - wire keeps burning up

I have an old Kenmore dryer. Lately, one of the wires that connects to the high temperature sensor on the side of the heating coils has been burning up at the point of contact (the wire burns, but the connector stays OK). The happened once a couple years ago and I replaced the sensor and the heating element. Now it's happening again, every few days (I'll admit it - I just reconnect the wire each time for now). I tested the sensor, and it seems to be working OK (frying pan test for conductivity). Any suggestions about fixing this more permanently?
Thanks,
Bruce Kimball
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Indicates the connection is high resistance -- clean/replace and make sure crimp(s) are also clean and tight.
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go baCK AT LEAST A FEW INCHES.
The machines I service for a living use heating elements and draw high current.
once a wire or connector looks toasted it needs REPLACED
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OBTW, be sure any replacement wire is high-temperature rated appliance wire.
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When wire overheats, the metal becomes annealed and looses it's conductive properties. To prevent it from repeating, cut the wire back to a point of clean metal, then reconnect it.

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...

I wouldn't expect any significant annealing to occur until temperatures are 400-500 K (800 F or so), which wouldn't expect to have been reached although suppose it might be possible.
There is about a 1-2%/ deg-C decrease in conductivity w/ temperature, while the wire is heated, but that is reversible.
I'd expect it the problem more likely to be surface oxidation or loose connections rather than actual metallurgical effects.
Never hurts to replace, however...
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wrote: ...

I wouldn't expect any significant annealing to occur until temperatures are 400-500 K (800 F or so), which wouldn't expect to have been reached although suppose it might be possible.
There is about a 1-2%/ deg-C decrease in conductivity w/ temperature, while the wire is heated, but that is reversible.
I'd expect it the problem more likely to be surface oxidation or loose connections rather than actual metallurgical effects.
Never hurts to replace, however...
-- From my experience working on commercial cooking equipment, poor connections cause the overheating and annealing
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I don't disagree at all about the poor connections; but I tend to think annealing isn't likely that much of an issue owing to the temperatures required.
I came back to correct my earlier posting in that 400-500K is actually 1200-1400F (knew that didn't seem right; dawned on me I only converted from C not K). I would think if these temperatures were reached the results would be fires not just overheating a connection.
--
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beekay wrote:

--
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Van Chocstraw
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Everybody, thanks! Looks like I need to do a better job repairing/replacing the wire.

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