Kenmore Canister vacuum cleaner: Bypassing the diode when connecting wire to the motor

Hi,
When the vacuum stopped working - I knew it was electricity issue but forgot about the lose prong on the ply which at that point was not visible after I pushed it in a while back, a friend of mine tried to check the wiring to the motor. In opening the housing, he must have yanked it since the wire connecting motor to diode became detached at the connecting point to the diode. he didn't have volt meter to test th circuit and so when the motor didn't run, he said that the diode was bad. In fact, he was calling the diode "fuse'.
Yesterday, I got another friend take a look at the vacuum cleaner. connected the wire bypassing the diode and tested the circuit with his volt meter. He found out there was no electricity coming in and checked the plug and we found the one prong almost disconnecting. So, we replaced the plug and the vacuum is working. (He said that the diode can be bypassed w/ no consequences.) He was rushing and so I didn't push him to put the diode back and re-do the wiring but I am concern whether this setup is potentially dangerous to cause motor damage. In fact, the light at the base unit came on and went off soon after when I was vacuuming a small area. It made me wonder whether the light bulb there got damage due to bypassing the diode.
Anyway, should I put the diode back and re-connect? I do have a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply for computers) unit and I am wondering whether plugging the vacuuming cleaner to it instead of the wall outlet until I put that diode back and re-do the wiring. Or is it okay to just use the vacuum w/ bypassing that diode?
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amandaF wrote:

Hmmm, Are you sure it's a diode? I tend to think the first guy was right saying it is fuse. Diode has no business with AC motor. And if you plug in the vacuum into UPS box, I am certain you'll damage it. UPS can handle computer which is not heavy load, vacuum needs lot more than computer; typically 12 Amp. or so. Bypassing fuse is a safety issue, if and when there is a problem, there will be no protection. If you really want to have peace in mind, wire back in the fuse. If you are interested, google about diode and see what this thing does. Good luck.
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I see.

I was wondering about that. I use my UPS for PC+ monitor+ speaker. I do not connect printer.

I wanted to prevent that.

I did. Since I was giving him my old Dell desktop with Altec Lansing subwoofer multimedia set in exchange for the work, I asked him to do the wiring the way the manufacturer made it. So I bought a soldering kit and we re- did it.

I did. I also didn't think that it was diode. By the way, if I ever need to replace that fuse, how do I got about finding the info of that fuse used in this vacuum cleaner?

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Thanks for the info.

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Don't pluc it into a computer UPS. Most vacuums need much more power than a computer UPS will provide (12A @ 120Vac = 1440VA - I doubt the UPS is rated that high? Anyway, it wouldn't run and could be awfully hard on the UPS battery and vacuum motor if it tries to run for very long (low voltage possible, more likely no voltage under that much load).
As for the diode, assuming it's really a diode, you indicated a light that quit working. That light (and others if there are any) is likely what the diode was for; just a cheap way to creating the lower voltage they wanted for the "light", LED, whatever it may be. I'm guessing of course, but if you ever want the lights to last, you probably have to put that diode back in the ckt. More importantly, there seems to be some question as to whether it's a diode or a fuse, based on what you've been told. If it's in series with the motor windings, it's not a diode; it's going to be a fuse, thermistor or some other type of temperature/current element. That makes it even more important to put back, so that you have the safety protection the unit was originally designed with. If it's only connected to the lights, etc. and not the motor, then it is more likely a diode.
Either rewire it properly or bring it to a shop would be my advice, the shop having preference right now, and based on this event, I'd not let those folks work on anything electrical again for you.
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You are right. Mine was around 600Volts. I should have done actual conversion calculation of 12 Amps to Volts first.

Okay.
This morning, when I used the vacuum briefly, it came one for a split second. may be the connection there is just loose. I did ask him to open that base unit but this guy is always rushing and said "It's not important". I didn't push it knwoing that he is not far in his life as his talent deserves because he's got no patience to do thins the right way.

I put that back yesterday.

Right. Thanks.

It's connected to the motor

I will not have let him to complicated electrical work. Once he diagnosed it
The first guy, mid to late 20s, was a friend of the brothers on my block (circle block) who had replaced a part for me at the base unit, the unit with the light issue I mentioned. (He and the brothers of my Romanian neighbors were playing football that day when I asked the older of the brothers to help me open that base unit to see ...). They asked him to take a look and he said that he fixed his Mom's vacuum all the time. So, this time, I thought he would have no problem to open the housing where the motor is. I let him open the housing to see whether any wiring was loose and also wanted to see/ learn. I didn't expect him to know complicated electrical work. Too bad that he had to struggle to open the housing; I guess people are not used to Kenmore design. I am not sure he owns a volt meter but if he did, he didn't have with him that day when he stopped by when he had a little time.
The second guy, 31 year old, knows a little more from practical work experience (not from proper training on electrical work).
BTW, after the first guy looked at it, I took it to Sear repair place and they said that igf the repair works goes over $90.00, they would call me. If I decided not to repair, I'd still pay the diagnosing fees like $50-60. Of course, at that time, I wasn't aware about the plug. I decided that I'd rather put my money into a new canister and has been looking for some handy individual on craigslist and then saw this guy's ad. I wasn't going to let anyone work on it without my supervision and w/o my approval at each step.
How long do these vacuum cleaner last? From the first experience of opening the base, I knew that the belt is in excellent condition. I did buy a spare one when I went to the repair center and the part that needed replacement. I am going to replace both Hepa filter at the point of intake air and the one in the housing area for the vacuum bag.The pipe, the wand, etc. seems fine..so far.
Oh, when I called local repair places, mot do not work on Kenmore because they cannot get the parts. One (via phone conversation) was quick to tell me that it sounded like the motor upon my explaining about the detached fuse. I didn't think the motor would go bad that quickly - of course, I wouldn't know how often they go bad - and the second guy told me that as well.
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