Kenmore Bottom Freezer Refrigerator - Is it working correctly?

I just purchased a Kenmore refrigerator - the thing is huge! Generally, I love it but the compressor runs practically 24/7. The settings are on default temperature, I rarely open it. Does this indicate a problem with the compressor? I am guessing yes because how could something be Energy Star compliant when it runs throughout the day?
So how do I quantify this for Sears - my retailer - so they will know that they have to come back and replace it?
Thanks Bob
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On Apr 17, 9:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've been wondering about this myself. I just got a new Kenmore with a bottom freezer, and while it doesn't run 24/7, it does seem to run a lot more than my old one did (although more quietly). It doesn't give off the heat the old one did either, the top of the fridge used to be a handy spot for proofing bread dough!
Is it possible that it IS using less energy due to a less powerful compressor, even if it is running more?
KD
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On Apr 17, 7:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The new units run a bit more but not 24x7, I would think, at least my 5yr old kenmore doesnt. If its running continuosly how could it cool at 90+ interior temps and with heavy use, Tell sears its broke and have them send out a tech , A 25$ Kill-a-Watt meter will tell you if electric usage is inline with its stated rating, it matches ratings for me on many apliances over days.
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ransley wrote:

I was told that the new ones run more but use less juice. How does one find out if that is true?
Lou
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Well, I may end up getting one of the Kill-a-Watt meters just to check. Luckily, it is pretty darned quiet or it would bother me.
Thanks for the tip.
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The best energy efficiency can be when the compressor does not stop and start at all, assuming that it is using only just enough energy to do the job. This seems to be a common concern with high efficiency refrigerators, along with taking a very long time to establish uniform and proper temperatures. All this is a trade-off for the energy efficiency, so I would give it a lot of time to stabilize and not be concerned about the run time.
Don Young
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Don Young wrote:

Starting any electric motor is a big energy user.
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Nah!
It takes less than a second to start a motor. Even if it draws 10 times the "normal" load, it's no different that letting the appliance run an extra 10 second.
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Well, I finally got around to getting a Kill-A-Watt meter. My refrigerator is still running for a large part of the day as far as I am concerned. However, it must be by design because the energy usage is right on target with the EnergyStar rating.
Now I can relax knowing my new refrigerator is working properly. That meter was a good investment and I am sure will come in handy in the future for other stuff.
Bob
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