Keeping door latches from freezing

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Have you ever found some sort of spray or grease that will keep stuff from freezing? We got rain yesterday, and a deep freeze right afterwards. Last night both push button door handles on my F-150 truck were frozen. The push botton door latch on the house storm door and a slide bolt on my toolshed door was also frozen.
Anyhow, have any of you ever found anything that will keep stuff like that from freezing? I was wondering about silicone spray? Maybe vaseline on the slide bolt, but that wont work on the truck? Any other ideas?
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wrote in message
Have you ever found some sort of spray or grease that will keep stuff from freezing? We got rain yesterday, and a deep freeze right afterwards. Last night both push button door handles on my F-150 truck were frozen. The push botton door latch on the house storm door and a slide bolt on my toolshed door was also frozen.
Anyhow, have any of you ever found anything that will keep stuff like that from freezing? I was wondering about silicone spray? Maybe vaseline on the slide bolt, but that wont work on the truck? Any other ideas? *****
Try this http://lmgtfy.com/?q=stop+car+locks+from+freezing
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Graphite spray.
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I've not known of graphite to be a water displacer.
Is there article on the web that describes this? Send URL?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Hmm, Graphite spray.
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WD -40
Bic
Spray antifreeze, don't get on paint, I think.
My one boss used to free the lock mechanism with bic.
I use silicone on the rubber window runners.
Greg
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One trick someone suggested is: Hold the key in a flame till it is quite hot, then stick it into the frozen lock.
I used to own a car in a place where it got cold enough to try that. I remember that it worked, but I can't remember whether it _always_ worked.
--
Wes Groleau

"What progress we are making! In the Middle Ages, they would have
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Use some mayo. Heck throw in some tuna salad for good measure.
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wrote:

WD-40 will evaporate real fast. I dont see that working for any length of time.
What is BIC?
I've used silicone spray on the rubber gaskets around a car door. It does help to keep the door from freeing to the gasket. I have not found anything to work on the metal door buttons or latches yet. I plan to get another can of silicone and try it as soon as I buy one, unless someone on here has a better solution.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

A cigarette lighter
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HeyBub wrote:

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Born In Covenant. (Mormon term.)
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

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On Tue, 13 Nov 2012 01:26:22 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

WD-40 protection is gone by the time you walk 20 feet. Silicone spray works for door seals. GM has some stuff that works pretty good, Super-Lube I think. A white lithium or silicone is sometimes recommended for latches. I've used it, and it's mediocre. The grease is difficult for penetrating tight places, and the aerosol isn't much better than WD-40. Maybe only 40-50 times better. What I have used most successfully for every metal latch/handle/hinge, car or house, is clean 10w40 motor oil, any brand, out of a dimple or pump oil can with a small nozzle. Squirt, work the moving parts a few times, wipe off excess.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote the following on 11/13/2012 2:26 AM (ET):

Cigarette lighter?

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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BIC is a manufacturer of a cigarette lighter. The suggestions was to use a BIC to heat up the key, so that when inserted into the lock, the heat would transfer to the lock causing it to thaw out. If you don't have a cigarette lighter, you can also use a propane torch, a welding torch or any other device that produces a controlable flame.
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Ok, I knew about those lighters, but thought the guy was referring to some spray or something like a lubricant. In my case, there is no key. Just the push buttons on the truck door, nad slide bolt on the shed and house screen door. Another thing to mention is that most of the time when these things freeze, it's during severe weather, which means wind. Goodluck trying to use a cig lighter in wind. A propane torch would work better, but I'd not want to use that on the slide bolt which is screwed to flammable wood. Even if the wood is not set on fire, the paint will be ruined, and minutes later the latch will be frozen again.
Since I open my toolshed often in winter, and that slide bolt keeps freezing, I'll just have to find some other way to latch the door. Till then, I keep and old hammer next to the door (outside) to pound it loose when it freezes. That's a pain in the ass to do when it's freezing cold.
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I've seen people cut some plastic (from a milk jug?), or rubber from inner tube. Staple or nail that over the bolt. That keeps the rain off the bolt.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Since I open my toolshed often in winter, and that slide bolt keeps freezing, I'll just have to find some other way to latch the door. Till then, I keep and old hammer next to the door (outside) to pound it loose when it freezes. That's a pain in the ass to do when it's freezing cold.
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On Tue, 13 Nov 2012 17:30:38 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Not a bad idea, in fact I like it.....
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Seems to work for old time country folk.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Not a bad idea, in fact I like it.....
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On 11/14/2012 4:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Whenever I wonder about how to cope with problems due to very cold weather, I always look at what the Russians in Siberia do to cope. ^_^
http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/struggling_with_snow_14073.html
http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh
TDD
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The article says the only way to regulate the indoor temp is by opening windows. To my way of thinking, if they covered parts of the radiators, it would reduce the heat input into the room. The heat would go back to the plant, and reduce the fuel consumption. Uncover as more heat is needed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Whenever I wonder about how to cope with problems due to very cold weather, I always look at what the Russians in Siberia do to cope. ^_^
http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/struggling_with_snow_14073.html
http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh
TDD
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