KABOOB!! A Gas Explosion Close To Home

Page 3 of 10  
On Wed, 18 Dec 2013 06:08:05 -0500, Stormin Mormon

No, I don't remember those days, Stormin'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/17/2013 8:54 PM, Guv Bob wrote:

If you've ever wondered why rigid electrical conduit is so much like the pipe used for plumbing, think about what happened many years ago when folks switched from gas lighting to electric lights. The wire was probably pulled in through the gas pipes to the converted gas light fixtures. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry W wrote:

Have you looked at the actual stats? I believe NFPA has some good ones showing 4,000+ residential gas explosions per year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/17/2013 11:24 PM, Pete C. wrote:

I'd sure like to see a URL. I did a search, including NFPA web site, and can't find that stat.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can't find something that isn't there....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Try again:
http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/files/research/fact%20sheets/gasfactsheet.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


*You* try again.
Where does that say "4000+ residential gas explosions per year", Pete? Nowhere.
Because that claim is bullshit. That document shows 3380 *fires* (not explosions) in a *five year* period. Not 4000 explosions. Not per year.
Like I said: you can't something that isn't there.
Are you a personal injury lawyer, by any chance?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

They don't differentiate fires with or without explosions. As well all know, most gas incidents start with a leak and it takes some time before the gas finds an ignition source, so it is quite reasonable to presume that most of those incidents included an explosion of some size.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And so you assume that *all* of those fires were "explosions".
Bullshit.
Look at the details, specifically: -- "... in which natural gas was the type of material first ignited", a category which clearly includes fires that occur while cooking on a gas stove -- "Leading equipment involved: Stove" -- "Leading area of origin: Kitchen"
All of which leads to the obvious conclusion that the problem is careless cooking, not the fuel used for doing so.
Obvious, that is, to anyone who doesn't have an a priori bias and an axe to grind.

Bullshit again. As CLEARLY indicated in the document that YOU cited, most residential gas- related fires started as cooking fires, not leaks. That document doesn't say anything at all about leaks.
Or explosions.

You mean like the cook turning on the burner? That's included in the category of "natural gas [is] the material first ignited."

No, it is not at all reasonable to assume that, for the reason I just explained above. And that's all it is: an assumption on your part, completely unsupported. That document says NOTHING about explosions, Pete. Nothing at all. It's talking about *fires*.
Your claim of 4000+ residential gas explosions per year is complete bullshit, totally without foundation. As I noted in an earlier post, if the rate were that high, we'd be seeing one about every 2.5 weeks here in the Indianapolis area. The last gas *explosion* I remember hearing about was about a year ago -- a deliberately set insurance fraud. If there really were over 4000 explosions per year in the U.S., we'd have had at least twenty more since then.
That. Just. Doesn't. Happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...snip...

Why did you leave off the last line?
-- leading factor contributing to ignition: Leak or Break

Which document are you reading? The one I am looking at specifically says "Leading factor contributing to ignition: leak or break"
http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/files/research/fact%20sheets/gasfactsheet.pdf
...snip...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Leak includes a burner that's not burning.

gas-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That doesn't explain why you said "That document doesn't say anything at all about leaks." For both LP and nat gas it says the leading contributing factor was leaks and breaks.
I'm not pushing back (or forth) on the safety of gas, I'm simply trying to determine if we are looking at the same document because I'm seeing statements in the doc that I'm reading that don't coincide with what you are saying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't read it as carefully as I should have; I was mistaken about leaks.
But not about explosions vs. fires.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is just a question...
When I light my stove, the gas comes from the burner head, a spark ignites the flowing (and floating) gas, things go POOF! and the burner is lit.
Isn't that an explosion prior to the fire?
If there is a gas leak in my gas pipe and a sparks causes that gas to ignite and my kitchen catches on fire, can we not equate the 3280 fires with "explosions", or at least some of them? An explosion doesn't mean the house has to be lifted off the foundation.
Seems to me that there are two ways to have fire with a gas leak as the initial cause: a flame applied directly to the leak or a spark causing a (minor) explosion POOF! and then a resulting fire. Seems like there would be more POOFs before a fire caused by a gas leak than direct contact with a flame.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Not really, no.

Some of them, probably. All of them? Or even nearly all? Then the document would be talking about explosions, not fires. Explosions can occur only in a fairly narrow range of fuel/air mixtures; either little fuel or too little oxygen, and combustion will not be sufficiently rapid to produce an explosion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 wrote:

The vast majority of those leaks are going to build a fair amount of fuel/air mixture before they find an ignition source. The explosion may range from just blowing out windows, to leveling the home and it's neighbors, but you can quite reasonably surmise that most of the incidents include some level of explosion. Fortunately in many of the cases people recognized the leak and got out before the explosion and/or fire. The count of course doesn't include the leaks that were contained without ignition.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Surmise. assume, presume -- but you still don't have any actual evidence, do you?
You made it up, Pete.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Call NFPA and ask them if you don't think it's true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You're lying, again. Only a lefty can lie so consistently.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's not the way it works, Pete. You made the claim, you back it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.