K & T wiring

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On 6/4/2010 11:07 AM J Burns spake thus:

Damn good question. Me, I collect loom from places where I tear out old K&T--knobs and tubes, too. So far I haven't found any use for the knobs, but the tubes make a dandy way to connect K&T wire to junction boxes: cut them short and insert them into NM clamps. I consider this an even better way to connect than using loom, which is softer and easier to break.
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Strangely, on jobs where I've removed K&T wiring, the loom is in terrible shape, completely dried out and brittle, unlike the wire which in most cases, is in near perfect condition. As Bud mentions, it's usually only bad where it's been installed in or near fixtures that got very hot.
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Well ultimately everyone here will find out which way things go at home resale time. and certinally no one should ever buy a new vehicle to get a safer one. who needs seat belts? air bags? etc?
my friends that tried to sell? one decided to remain in the home, the balance either paid to have a rewire before the sale completed, or gave a big discount to pay the buyer for the upgrade.
the trouble with waiting???
what you do before you put home on market is your business, once its for sale its registered bonded electricians plumbers etc.
if you do a good job on a rewire beforee sale you can save a ton of bucks.
things have changed dramatically in the last 5 years, homeowner companies aqre super risk adverse
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On 06/04/2010 10:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you're not a shitty driver, buying a new car just to get a safer one is a spectacularly bad deal. Most of the best bang-for-your-buck safety improvements were made mandatory long before most of the cars still on the road today were built - I'm talking late 60's, early 70's here.
That said, I'd still feel way safer in, say, an 80's Mercedes-Benz or Porsche than I would in a new tin can. There's a big difference in quality...
nate
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On Jun 4, 10:42

did you see the planned crash of a 60 bel air, and a 2009 malibu.
the malibu driver would of walked away the old belair driver would of died several times over. building new vehiclews to crush and absorb the impact is really great engineering
remember any K&T install today is likely over a 100 years old. so it missed all the advances along the way......
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On 06/05/2010 09:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It was a '59, and yes. What a waste, I've driven cars that looked worse than the one they destroyed.

Sure, but a car only ten years newer would have had three point belts, a collapsible steering column, dual circuit brakes, side marker lights, etc. etc. etc... and a '69 is way on the thin end of the bell curve as far as cars that are likely to still be used as daily drivers today. A '79, still on the thin end of the bell curve, would have side impact door beams in addition to all the other stuff.
My personal vehicles are a '55, and '88, and a '93 and I don't feel particularly unsafe in any of them, although the '55 does require a certain amount of respect. Proper maintenance and repair at the first sign of trouble is far more important than worrying about safety features that God willing will never be used. Likewise, I'd consider good tires, good shocks/struts, and properly maintained base brakes to be more fundamental to safety than ABS or ESC, although a lot of people seem not to think of that.

I'm not arguing the point that the best way to deal with K&T is to replace it at the first sign of trouble. I'm just saying that buying a "new car for increased safety" is likely a bad deal, unless you're *planning* on wrecking.
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Well a new car tends to be safer more conveient and more reliable. Just like replaced K&T
Discussing this is like trying to explain to a friend why he needed to replace all his galvanized water lines. the flow was terrible he proclaimed he was patient.
leaks esclated over time, he finally gave up and replumbed after 18 patches, there was little galvanized remaing by that time.
he still claims it was better than copper.
he is now in the same situation with cast iron drain pipes.
he applies epoxy and clamps over patches claiming all is fine. his house smells of sewer.
but his roof is 35 years old he tars leaks every spring and fall
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Almost as pointless as getting some folks to punctuate, spell, and capitalize properly.
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On 06/05/2010 03:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have not found this to be the case. If anything, when something goes wrong with an older car I usually know exactly what it is, how to fix it, and have the tools to do the job right. Not so much with a newer car.
nate
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You ever tried getting parts for a 50 or 100 year old car?
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On 06/05/2010 09:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not the latter, but I do the former all the time.
Which is, of course, not what we're talking about. Most "old" cars still in daily use are only 15-20 years old at most.
nate
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On 6/5/2010 9:06 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

Ihave a 50+ year old truck and i really don't remember the last time it NEEDED a part. Hmmmmm.....
steve
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my best friend has a 66 jeep and 68 impala. he cant take either vehicle more than 100 miles from home free towing because parts and service arent easily available.
truly older vehicles broke more, but were far easier to fix
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On 6/6/2010 9:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This must be the same friend with the alleged k&T fire who can't get insurance. LMMFAO!!
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On 06/06/2010 10:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What model Jeep? I might be willing to take that old, unreliable POS off his hands :)
nate
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On 06/06/2010 10:07 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

Well, I have a friend that buys and sells old cars and sometimes I do work for him... e.g. today I was cleaning/painting dash parts for an Avanti that we're going to try to get a new wiring harness into next weekend...
On the upside, when I *do* need parts, the experience lets me go right to where I need to go with the first email or phone call :)
nate
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wrote:

Model-T parts are easy to come by. Originals aren't so easy but parts for them are still being made.
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wrote:

you ever ride in one of those, its like riding in a western wagon, nearly no suspension.
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On 6/6/2010 3:23 PM snipped-for-privacy@aol.com spake thus:

Yeah, I guess anyone who has a Model T is an idiot who should just drive it to the nearest junkyard and have it crushed, right?
Sheesh.
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wrote:

That may be, but they certainly fit the criteria and parts are easy to come by.
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