just wondering

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I've had friends go to their "under comstruction" homes and shovel 2 feet of snow out of "what will be the living room."
As far as I know, none of the homes are worse for the experience.
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wrote:

Back in the day when OSB was a newer product, I always heard that it would handle three times being soaked without any problems. Snow should cause NO problems if you get it off before the sun hits it hard. I've seen it soaked so many times that the edges blow up over a quarter inch though. Around here the high volume builders could give a crap if it blew up to an inch and a half anyway. I try to avoid those kind of guys.
Lefty
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Lefty wrote:

I know I'm a Luddite, and it is probably a moot point anyway since I'll never be able to afford a new-construction house, but I still don't trust OSB for subfloor or roof decking, or corner sheathing. It just looks and feels wrong. I suppose it is okay for the web in engineered joists, which seem to be the modern standard, but anything facing the weather, I want real plywood.
-- aem sends...
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A lot of people are using Georgia-Pacific Plytanium product called Dryply. It can survive a month or so of bad weather. It is manufactured for greater stiffness as needed in subflooring. Our local Menards store carries it and this is my choice for subflooring projects, especially in bathroom and utility areas where disasters might occur. The price is not that much more than ordinary CDX. With ring shank nails or construction screws it does seem more rigid than conventional subflooring. Plytanium and Dryply fit together OK with tongue and groove edges, too.
Joe
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wrote:

Cover it with a tarp? A sheet of plastic will do, it is good insurance to have a roll on hand just in case. Getting ply wet for an extended period of time will weaken it, possibly it will fall apart.
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