joints in sheetrock

My sheetrock is up, but the panels aren't all perfectly flush against one another. In most cases where there is a gap it's 1/16 - 1/8, but there are a couple seams that are up to 1/4 inch. What is the best method to attack these when taping and mudding? Should I cut thin strips of sheetrock and fit them in before taping, or will the taping itself be sufficient to cover the seam? Any particular suggestions? Thanks.
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My assumption is that you plan to tape this yourself. My recommendation is to hire a professional taper. Those guys make even lousy sheetrock jobs look good, they work fast and overall pretty cheap.

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You recommend hiring just a taper, or someone to tape and mud (and sand, etc)?
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On Jan 21, 5:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Unless you have watched a pro do it before, or have done it yourself at least once, hire a pro for the entire tape/mud process. If he is good, there should be very little or no sanding involved. Just watching one for 15 minutes is an education. The books can give you 'what to do' but they do _not_ tell you 'how", i.e., the technique of laying and smoothing mud.
Harry K
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I guess I should have clarified - I have patched holes, taped and mudded, and even fixed half-panels on a vaulted ceiling after water damage - all with relatively good results. Not professional, but quite good and up to my standards. However, I want these seams to look as good as possible, and was just looking for opinions (professional or otherwise) on how to deal with these gaps in seams, since I know my limitations and thought I could benefit from other people's experiences. I'm thinking I'll pre-fill the gaps with compound, let it dry, then beginning my taping and mudding process, unless I hear otherwise that someone has a better way. Any ideas?
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That's pretty much a waste of time, regardless of whether you're using mesh or paper. Just do what you're supposed to do. For mesh, put the tape on first. Some mud will ooze through the tape. For paper, just layer on some mud and paper over as normal. As long as there is a usual amount of mud behind and on top of the tape, it's the tape that will give it its strength.
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Harry K wrote:

They also use a flat box to apply the mud to the joints. They can tape a room in only a few minutes and cover in in about 10 minutes. This box is just run along the joint and it applies and smooths the mud in one single, easy step.
http://www.tapepro.com/products/fb /
Don't forget the pump to fill it.
http://www.tapepro.com/products/lp /
Then check out the other toys the pros play with!
Otherwise, just prefill the gaps and start taping! 1/4 is pushing the limit without filling with slivers of drywall.
Mike D.
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Man, Mike, those toys look cool. Almost makes me want to change professions! Anyway, so would you recommend filling with slivers of drywall then, or just prefilling with mud? If you do think slivers of drywall would be best, do I just wedge them in and let friction take hold or how would I get them to stay (since 1/4" slivers won't take a screw without crumbling). Thanks for the links!
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Don't really need to do anything.
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You can fill it with a setting type compaound like durarock.

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You probably mean DuraBond -- but that's a mistake, too. Setting-type compound, sure, but one that can be sanded such as EasySand.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Jan 21, 10:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Durabond is tailor-made for the OP's situation. It's stronger than regular joint compound or EasySand, so if he has any concerns due to the joint gaps Durabond is an excellent way to go. The only caveat is to make sure that the Durabond coat(s) are smooth and not overfilled - leave room for the easier-to-sand finish coat(s).
R
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