Jigsaw recommendation

I'm going to be removing some windows in an outdoor addition to my house. This addition was installed by the previous owner and unfortunately he used particle board for the walls. These walls have molded very badly despite all my efforts otherwise. They are beyond repair (not that I'd repair them anyway).
There are 5 relatively new windows in excellent condition I want to remove from these walls before I tear the extension down. The walls are vinyl-sded on the outside and painted on the inside. There is a small layer of insulation in between. I need a good jigsaw to tear through all this to remove the windows.
What kind of jigsaw would be best for this application, and how many amps should it be rated? Would I be better off with an orbital saw?
I've seen several brands: B&D, Craftsman, Craftsman Professional, DeWalt, Mikita, Milwaukee Skil, and others. I've heard good things about DeWalt and Mikita but most of the 6+amp models are out of my price range. I really don't want to spend over $120.
Any comments?
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Sounds as though you need a reciprocating saw. I saw a Ryobi electric model for $59.00 at Home Depot several months ago.
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I think you need a reciprocating saw. Harbor Freight has one that will get the job done. If you want one for the rest of your life and your grandkids, get a Milwaukee. If you are truly knocking down a structure or portion of, you will definitely want the recip saw.
Here is an example: < http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber@95>
<http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/articles/showarticle.asp?articleID 30&partID=2> ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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BOSCH

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I guess you did not read the part about *price limit of $120*. What Bosch jigsaw sells for less than that?
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On 9 Aug 2006 14:19:10 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

If it is a one time deal, rent a recip saw from the local construction rental place. They will generally have a good durable and reliable brand (Milwaukee, Porter Cable, etc) and renting will cost you much less.
Although, you might find a lot of other uses for it in the demolition of the extension for the recip. In that case buy a good one. When you're finished, if you're out of the demolition/construction business you can always sell a good brand.
Frank
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The best saw for the job is a reciprocating saw. If it is something you will have little use for in the future, you can find them for less than your budget. If you want the best, get a Milwaukee, but that will top $150. Recip saws can be used for trimming tree branches also, up to 4" or so.
A jigsaw may do what you want with a long blade on it. If you go that route, avoid the B & D, go with a DeWalt, Milwaukee, or Porter Cable. Bosch is best, but about $160. Jigsaws have many other uses if you like to build things.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you don't want to rent, don't mess around. Log on to eBay and keep looking until you find a Milwaukee SawzAll in your price range. Use PayPal or similar for safety. Lots of decent tools show up if you're patient. For your mold problem, consider using mold resistant bulding products. Drywall comes that way now, other products may be available as well. Good luck.
Joe
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Why not rent a Sawz All from a tool place?
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Sounds like a sawzall is in order! Do what most of the contractor's around here seem to be doing. Go buy it, use it, then return it. Saves the cost of renting.... Horrible practice but it's allowed me to buy some "used" equipment from Lowes at a pretty good markdown (of course I'm paying for it in the long run with Mfg's having to mark up their prices to cover this practice).. Cheers, cc
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If you buy a SawZall, keep it. They are handy for lots of things, and work when nothing else will quite do the job. If you own one, it seems like you go looking for things to do with it. As for buying, using, and returning, that's for low lifes.
Steve
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how I ever got on without it before.
As for returning tools, I agree as well. Cheap bastards. I spend my hard earned cash wisely and if a tool doesn't perform as advertised, I'll return it but to date I've returned a total of zero tools. I had to stand in line to return a few copper fittings left over from a project (unused I might add!) and had to wait while the guy in front of me tried to explain what was wrong with his brand new Makita Hammer Drill. The manager tested it out and all seemed fine. They still gave him his money back. If I hadn't bought a Milwaukee hammer drill a few months back I'd of made an offer on it. Cheers, cc
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when they first became affordable for DIY. Wasn't sure how much I'd use it after the first project but turns out I cut a lot of things with it I wouldn't consider with any of my other saws. IMHO its too valuable a tool to waste time & $ returning. The reciprocating saw may be the best for this job but if you can use a jigsaw and need to be able make accurate cuts on future projects it may be the way to go. I haven't used my spiral saw very much but so far it seems worthless on anything thicker than 1/8". Just my $.02. I'm sure you'll get lots of opinions. For $120 you should be able get a usable reciprocating saw and a jigsaw for home use. I've had good luck with B&D and Craftsman. Biggest problem I've had with buying power tools is buying ones without enough power. My reciprocating saw is 6amp. That's been enough. DeWalt, Mikita and Milwaukee may be better but I doubt you'd work them hard enough to justify the extra cost.
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A lot of recip saws on the market are pretty much alike. The Milwaukee Super SawzAll, however, is a whole different animal. The mechanism has a trick antivibration system that allows you to cut without holding the saw tight to the work in a death grip. For serious construction people this means you can use the tool one handed in awkward situations safely, like high on a ladder. In ordinary use your cut is faster and more accurate. All in all, definitely worth the $$ to be free of cheap tool aggravations. Hope these comments will be helpful.
Joe
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Ever heard of a hand saw? I did that exact job on one window recently. They run at less than $10, and you can do a lot more with one than a jigsaw - you're not talking scrollwork here......

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I assume that you're trying to cut the whole window frame out of their rough frame openings. Remember that the window is held in with some shims and nails (or possibly screws), and the rest of any "attachment" (eg: possibly exterior vinyl flanges, or caulking, or spray insulating foam) can be cut with a good solid knife.
So the saw will at most be cutting some shims and thru nails.
A reciprocating saw is the right thing to use, but a jig saw with a long blade might also do the trick. In a pinch, even a hacksaw blade will do. Remember to get a metal cutting blade...
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

My neighbor says the windows (vinyl casement), are not salvageable even though they're only a few years old. He said the mounting fram would be no good even if I removed them carefully. This strikes me as odd. The windows are all in vgc so I'm not sure why the couldn't be re-used.
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