Jennair Oven only putting out 115 V

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My Jennair oven is taking forever to heat up and has difficulty holding temp.
I just put the voltmeter across the terminals and find that it is only pulling about 115Vdc, which would explain the problem.
Any idea why it would be doing this? Is there a fuse that could've blown taking out one leg of the 240V?
Thanks,
Ian
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On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 11:35:39 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

New info: When I check each terminal to ground, the brown/ground has 115V but the red/ground has zero.
What does that tell us?
Ian
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On 9/7/2015 11:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

Did you check the circuit breaker? One leg may be out. Trip it and reset it.
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On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 11:57:34 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And if that doesn't work, see if there is 115V from red to neutral/ground at the breaker.
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The first thing that comes to mind is for you to call an electrician when you have to ask a question like that.
You are in the US and not some where else ?
For things to try, go to the circuit breaker if you have that or the fuse panel for the house. Cut the breaker off and back on to see if one leg somehow tripped with out tripping the other (which is very unusual). If there are fuses, most like one is blown. Pull the fuse block out and check each fuse with the ohm meter.
If the fuses are good, then is the stove plugged in ? If so, how many wires are there, 3 or 4 ? Two of the wires will have 240 volts between them. If 3 wires there should be 120 volts between two of the wires and the other (ground/neutral) wire. If 4 wires, then there will be 0 volts between the ground and neutral wires, and 120 volts between either of those wires and one of the other wires.
The red and what you are calling brown (which is usually black) are the two hot wires and anything else should be green for ground and white for neutral depending on the number of wires.
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On Mon, 7 Sep 2015 08:54:58 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

code, unsafe, and unlikely) If you have a fused panel instead of a breaker panel you could have a blown fuse in the panel. Otherwise, Check for fuse in the actual range/oven. Check the manual for location. If no bad fuses, call electrician to check connections in panel
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wrote in message wrote:

New info: When I check each terminal to ground, the brown/ground has 115V but the red/ground has zero.
This would indicate that you heating element has grounded, checking little more will show that that wire to terminal on the heater is open or fuse blown some ovens may have fuse link that opens with heat similar to your heir dryer. Unless you know electronics/electric get professional to check it out.
What does that tell us?
Ian
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On Mon, 7 Sep 2015 08:35:28 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

Where are you in the world where you would run a JennAire oven on DC?? Use your AC meter to measure. As far as one leg fuse going out, that will give you zero volts, not 110, because you are measuring leg to leg. You would only get 110 leg to neutral on one side if the other side was open.
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I have problem with you readings how do you get "DC" do you have solar power? If you running at 115 VAC and your oven have dual element and you took readings at bottom element then your top element is open or visa versa
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My Jennair oven is taking forever to heat up and has difficulty holding temp.
I just put the voltmeter across the terminals and find that it is only pulling about 115Vdc, which would explain the problem.
Any idea why it would be doing this? Is there a fuse that could've blown taking out one leg of the 240V?
Thanks,
Ian
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Ovens (or other LOADS) don't "put out" 115V. They *see* whatever voltage is impressed from the *source*.
On 9/7/2015 8:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

In the US (as you don't say where you are located), residential power is delivered over a "center tapped, 220V supply". In essence, this *looks* like two 110VAC circuits. But, if you examined the waveforms, you'd see that they are 180 degrees out of phase.
220V appliances are powered from the two "hots"; the "neutral" (which is the "center tap") carries no current. (Neutral is tied to EARTH, eventually. But, a fourth "ground" conductor often brings that EARTH directly to the appliance -- much the same as the *third* wire on a 110V electric outlet).
110V appliances are powered from *one* of the "hots" and the neutral. Ideally, the loads in your house are arranged so half of the 110V loads are on one leg (hot#1) and the other half on the other leg (hot#2).
Some appliances use 110V *and* 220V. E.g., a stove/oven/electric dryer usually uses a lot of power so being able to operate from 220V means each *wire* (conductor) need only supply half of the total current (amperage; power = amps * volts). But, those appliances often have portions that don't *need* the higher voltage: e.g., the *clock* in your stove, the control electronics in your dryer, etc. In this case, that *portion* of the device that only needs 110V can use one of the hots (leg1 or leg2 -- either one!) for that need while using *both* hots for the other, higher power requirements.

Exactly. If you have fuses, then one could have blown without the other. If you have circuit breakers, one "half" could have blown without taking out the other "half". Circuit breakers for 220V circuits should be ganged together -- mechanically tied -- so that one leg tripping FORCES the other leg to trip. But, sometimes this doesn't happen properly. Other times, someone has *cut* the mechanical link to ALLOW one half to be switched on/off without regard for the "other half".
Remember, any time a breaker/fuse trips, there WAS A REASON. Don't fall for the temptation of just flipping it back on repeatedly until it *appears* to stay on. Make sure you understand WHY it has tripped and remove any potential safety hazzard. E.g., one "leg" may have partially shorted to the metal case -- "ground" -- which would cause it to blow/trip; turning the power back on hasn't fixed the problem even if it *may* appears to have gone away (e.g., the portion of the conductor that was nearest to the metal case may have been melted away in that first "event"; but the problem is still waiting to reappear.)
If you're uncomfortable with "things electric", DO hire someone who is equipped/licensed to do so!
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snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

scale or is it typo?
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On 09/07/2015 10:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

Not an oven problem, the feed to one line is out...
possibly a wire burned off...
check the breaker box and outlet
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philo wrote:

Sounds like reasonable logical approach to solve the problem.
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[snip]
Did it ever work ok? It sounds like a pretty simply wiring fuckup.
If you have to ask, though, you should probably get a ocal expert
--
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 7 Sep 2015 08:35:28 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

You need to make a drawing, on paper, with all the wires you've found included, and all the voltages you've found between two locations marked, maybe even in different colors if you need that to keep them straight.
You might also want to unpplug or disconnect the oven from the wall, from the power, and measure some resistances, with the switch on, of course (although I don't know much about your switches and some problems might be in a switch, for all I know.) Definitely use a different color for ohms from what you use for AC volts.
When it's all in front of you, you should either realize you need more measurements or you have enough to hone in on the problem.
--

Stumpy Strumpet
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wrote:

you if you have a problem in the power supply/house wiring. If that's OK, then the problem, by default, is in the stove itself. L1 to L2 should be 240. L1 to ground and L2 to ground should be 120 N to ground (if a 4 wire plug) should be zero.
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On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 11:35:39 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

My bad. Typo. I meant 115 V-AC.
I am in Canada, not that that matters much I suspect. Same as US.
Tried resetting the breaker. No difference.
Will call a Sparky and get it done right.
Thanks,
Ian
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On 9/7/2015 8:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sherwoodwindows.com wrote:

Just FYI, most heating and AC and refrigeration guys do a LOT of work with electricity, if the sparkys are too e$pen$ive.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Mon, 7 Sep 2015 21:16:05 -0400, Stormin Mormon

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wrote:

just hire the 12 year old braniac next door.
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