Jacking out a SHORT retaining wall?

I've got a short (2 high 4x4) retaining wall around the pond that I want to remove temporarily.
So I go out this morning full of piss and vinegar, thinking I'll put my pick under it and will it loosen right up. Well I wiggled some body parts loose, but not much luck with the wall. Next, came the big guns, long heavy 2" steel pipe. I could bend the pipe at will, but the crappy little retaining wall did not budge. :-(
So I'm wondering if a farm jack might be a better approach to getting it out, preferably in good shape.
Any ideas?
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Do you have any idea how the wall is fixed to the ground?
There could be re-bar pounded through the 4x4's extending multiple feet into the ground, and sunk into concrete. There could be vertical 4x4's extending multiple feet into the ground, and sunk into concrete. There could be horizontal members buried under the ground behind the wall to keep it from tilting forward. etc, etc.
I think you need to determine how the wall went in, in order to determine how to get it out.
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wrote:

It's got rebar every 18" or so about 4' into the ground. No cement and no buried members. So I was surprised I could not just lift it out.
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What is it tied down with? Did you put it in? The 4x4 or railroad tie retaining walls I put in were usually pinned with 18-30" pieces of rebar hammered through tight holes. Somtimes in multiple directions. Sometimes with an L on the end, if the uphill side was being backfilled. The holes are not always visible in the exposed face of the timber.
aem sends....
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Yes, I'm the dipshit who put it in. Since it's more show than go, I expected it to come out no problem. Bottom 4x4 is held in place by 4' rebar every 18" hammered more or less straight into the ground. Top row is held in place with 6" lag bolts.
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You've discovered the reason for the deformations on the rebar. If they hold the rebar that tight in soil, think what it does in concrete. You may have to cut it up and take it out in pieces.
R
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wrote:

42" in the ground every 18"!?! Yeah, that is gonna hold on pretty tight. Just what were you expecting to push on the thing?
Get out the wrench and unbolt top layer, and use a shovel and sawzall or angle grinder to chop off the rebar under the bottom layer. Just pound the stubs into ground where they won't mess up what new work you are doing. Rebar is cheap- make new pins when you put it back. IMHO, they don't need to be that long- a couple of feet is plenty for an 8" high wall.
aem sends....
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