Items a customer should put in a drywall contract


I am going to be getting estimates and then signing a contract to have 3 rooms (game room, bedroom, storage room) in my basement, drywalled, taped, and textured.
I would like to get some suggestions for "Do's and Don'ts" that I should specify in my contract to makes sure the contractor does not implement any "inappropriate" shortcuts that result in a less than optimum result.
For example:
1. The drywall shall be attached with screws. 2. ...
Thanks, Jess
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*I'm not a fan of textured drywall because it is so difficult to match after a repair has been made.
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Echo that. It's unlikely that you'll ever touch the ceilings again, and some form of texture is often preferable aesthetically, but do you really want texture on the walls? If you ever scrape it need access to pipes or wires etc you're going to having to repair the texture. I've tried to match many times - there are numerous techniques you will see if you google - but none of them blend in well and I've always ended up respraying the whole wall which is a major PITA. Also, I don't like the way orange peel looks after it's had more than a couple of coats of paint - looks like a more sloppy finish. Moreover, I don't think you can beat a nice flat finish on a well mudded wall.
Anyway....to actually answer your question... I would require taping of all joints (seems obvious, I know), I assume you want 1/2", I would give them a clear time limit to get the job done (ideally you'd like to see consecutive days until they're done, but it may not work out like that unless you make it a requirement) and would include one coat of primer as part of the job so you can properly assess the quality of the finish before you pay up.
Cub
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wrote:

Echo that. It's unlikely that you'll ever touch the ceilings again, and some form of texture is often preferable aesthetically, but do you really want texture on the walls? If you ever scrape it need access to pipes or wires etc you're going to having to repair the texture. I've tried to match many times - there are numerous techniques you will see if you google - but none of them blend in well and I've always ended up respraying the whole wall which is a major PITA. Also, I don't like the way orange peel looks after it's had more than a couple of coats of paint - looks like a more sloppy finish. Moreover, I don't think you can beat a nice flat finish on a well mudded wall.
Anyway....to actually answer your question... I would require taping of all joints (seems obvious, I know), I assume you want 1/2", I would give them a clear time limit to get the job done (ideally you'd like to see consecutive days until they're done, but it may not work out like that unless you make it a requirement) and would include one coat of primer as part of the job so you can properly assess the quality of the finish before you pay up.
Cub
Stay away from textures..They always end up being a PITA and look like crap after a while as pointed out...
1. Since it is a basement Moisture and Mold Resistant Sheetrock is an option..
2. Ceiling will be strapped 16 inches on center with 1X3 fir strapping..
3.All USG materials will be used and applied to manufactures specs...(Other brands are fine too , again to spec)
4. All corner bead will be nailed on and not crimped on..
5. Work will be done in a timely manner..(Sometimes due to drying time consecutive days are not possible on a job that small especially in a basement)
6. Any extra daily clean up requirements or other special considerations..
7. All scrap sheetrock and garbage is the responsibility of the contractor to remove and dispose of
8. A coat of primer to be applied to manufacturer's specs..( if you want)...
You should also TELL them where to pull power from , where to park and what bathroom to use...HTH...Of course if you do some of that it will reduce your cost...
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Get the ceilings done with double layer of drywall to increase soundproofing. That is best soundproofing method and cheap when done at the start. The drywall comes with two layers taped together which contractor cuts to separate the sheets. So it is easy to have a double layer unless there is a lot of cutting required. In that case have the sheets separated and installed with overlap. Only the last layer needs taping.
The extra mass absorbs sound very well. I wish I had even done the doubling for my house upstairs bedrooms to minimize sound transmission from room to room. Only heard about doubling after job was done and I complained about noise. Then they tell you that doubling is standard when noise is an issue.
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theres sound proofing batt insulation. and special sound deadening drywall scred not to joists but special hangers.
but before you do any of this has water EVER gotten into your basement EVER?
if so address that first.!!!!
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basements are really meant to have open cielings for easy repair access.
sure dont think about it now, but ponder my statement when your tearing down a cieling looking for a leak:(
At least make a map with measurements and photos of where EVERYTHING IS. and keep it secure for future reference and future owners:)
Realize it ILLEGAL to drywall over or make inaccesible ANY electric boxes.
Somone did that to my old house, had dimming lights:( had to tear down most of the cieling:( then ripped the rest out and went with suspended tiles
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