It will cost 36 dollars or less

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So I needed to recharge the fire-extinguisher I used two nights ago, and I googled and called the place nearest me, and I described my fire-extinguisher and asked how much to recharge.
And he said "36 dollars or less". Every other merchant says "$N or more", "Prices start at X dollars." What's going on here? He had an eastern European accent, I think.
It turns out they sell these things, a Kidde 340, for 21 dollars plus 14 dollars shipping, never used but recharged, on ebay, for a total of 35, one dollar less than his 36 max. (New they are between 70 and 80)
eBay, Amazon, Overstock, Bidtopia
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Did you ever price a new one, I junk them when they get low, its not worth the headache recharging them unless you have lots of them
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On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 19:21:55 -0800 (PST), ransley

"
I did buy a replacement for a smaller one but this one is rechargeable.
Yes I did price new ones and they are a little more than twice what reconditioned are.
Bob, perhaps recycling them has gotten more organized over time. And maybe shipping costs have gone down. This place that sells never used but recharged probably has loads, because periodically someone replaces all the fire extinguishers all over almost every building in the country, almost all of them never used. I guess the replacements are mostly reconditioned, but not all of them.
At least the first time I would take one to get recharged, I would find it very interesting to see the place where they do it. If I'm lucky, I'll get to see the shop. Of course I might not get past the counter. He he might trade me one that is already recharged for my empty one, but I'd still find the place interesting.
I'm afraid unlike some I have to suffer headaches in order to save money. I also prefer to turn the empty one into someone who will reuse it. In fact even if I bug a recharged one online, I'll probably drop the empty one off at the first guy's location, not far from me, at no cost to him, just so he can reuse it.
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wrote:

tax, 53 dollars, that these places wanted 70 to 80 dollars for.
Strange for 2 reasons: A) Usually the web is cheaper. Here it is 20 dollars more. That's a lot. B) Home Depot again loses the web competition, since they didn't come up when I did google shopping for the fire extningisher. Doesn't include metal bracket which is 6 dollars but I still have the old one.
Same price and probems with lowes.
It turns out Model 340 means 3-A, 40-BC, which is really strange since the model 210, 2-A, 10-BC, is the same price.
Plus they have a third one with the same ratings** but a nylon instead of metal handle for 10 dollars less but not rechargeable and not in stock at the HD I was at. (where I was. ?)
**But no rating in the name: Kidde Full Home Fire Extinguisher Model # FX340GW
None are sold online, although that other refurbishing company sold on-line.

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Here is how they recharge dry chemical fire extinguishers.
Step one. Discharge the old unit into a container.
Step two. Inspect the inside to be sure it is empty and dry inside.
Step three. Inspect O-rings and replace as needed.
Step four. Inspect hydro-test inspection stamp and re-hydro-test if due.
Step five. Insert funnel and refill dry chemical filtering out any lumps, weigh to assure full charge.
Step six. Install new internal inspection sticker on dip tube.
Step seven. Reassemble and charge with dry nitrogen.
Step eight. Install a charge tag and seal on outside.
The two big items are the hydro test and the cost of the chemical if the extinguisher has been used. The latter is usually no big deal as the chem. is baking soda with an anti caking agent and the units that fail the hydro test add to the supply of powder. The hydro test is no big deal either. it is done the dame way they do welding tanks, just with a lower test pressure. The big issue is the additional time it takes to test and dry the tank.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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wrote:

With the "or less" guy you have no surprises. The labor to charge a unit is about the same no matter the size. The material inside is not so much. A pro knows what the larger sizes are so he gave you th at price, less for a smaller one. The other guy may be giving you a low ball price and then slams you when you get there.
Prices can vary by accent too.
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This makes sense. I hope you are right. There are other places I could call but some don't give addresses, and this one is much much closer than the others that do.

LOL. I thought maybe there were different pricing strategies in different parts of the world.
Especially I thought the English usage group I also posted too might have an opinion on that.
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mm wrote:

When I asked a shop about this, I was told it's cheaper to buy a new one.
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I bought a 3 pound (ABC) Kidde from Wal-Mart for about 20 bucks.
You can buy 2 of them instead (and have the added advantage of placing them in separate locations).
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That's what I'd do. Oh, don't bolt one over the stove. Put it on the far wall away from the stove.
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Put it near the exit. When fighting a fire with an extinguisher, you always want to be between the fire and the exit. With it near the exit that will naturally happen. You also have the option of picking up the extinguisher, turning around towards the fire, deciding it's too much, and heading out the door. -- Doug
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Wondered if anyone would comment that.
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Christopher A. Young
(whose fire extinguishers are arms reach from the main door
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G. Morgan wrote:

When I had my own business my insurance wouldn't allow that. I had a small (I forget the size) one in my shop. In writing, the insurance inspector made me buy a larger one and REMOVE the smaller one. I couldn't hang it at the other side of the shop, I couldn't leave it anywhere in the shop. The small one had to be removed!
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Now, that sounds like a dictator.
I do not like it here or there! I do not like it any where. I'm an insurance inspector My brain suffers a heck of complector And don't you oogle and stare.
Dr. Seuss, commenting on insurance dictators.
I'm going into withdrawl. No one has used the word "Nazi" on this list in ages. An insurance, Nazi, that's what he was.
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wrote:

I already have a smaller one in the basement. I like that this one was as big as it was. It took three blasts (no more than 15 seconds, probably more like 10 total) to put the fire out.

I don't believe they make rules like that for no good reason, Probably too many people with small extinguishers that didnt' do the job. No time to get the big one after the small one fails.
BTW, as to it being filled with baking soda, the label says: monoammonium phosphate, mica, ammonium phosphate, talc, nuisance dust, irritant, hmis 1-0-0
(since it's not food I've never heard that ingredients have to be in any particular order, but maybe they are. )
Almost every reference to hmis 1-0-0 is in a pdf file, but I found one for fire extinguishers that wasn't. "ABC dry chemical extinguisher is the second most common extinguisher used in motor homes. The material used in this type of extinguisher is Monoammonium Phosphate. This material has a Hazardous Material Identification System number of HMIS 1-0-0. These numbers mean the material is a Hazardous Material that is toxic. This material becomes very corrosive when heated. It is very difficult to clean because it melts to the surfaces it comes in contact with. This type of extinguisher has very limited Class A extinguishing ability (common combustibles, paper, fiberglass, wood, 12v wiring and most of the materials used in RVs or boats). It takes a large ABC dry chemical extinguisher to handle a relatively small Class A fire. These extinguishers also pack easily and loose air."
The previous paragraph is about baking soda: "BC dry powder extinguisher is the most common and least expensive extinguisher. The material used in this type of extinguisher is non-toxic Sodium Bicarbonate. In a non-motorized RV (trailer or 5th wheel) no matter the size or type of construction, only one 5 BC extinguisher is required. For motorized RVs classes A, B or C motor homes no matter the size, only one 10 BC extinguisher is required. This means 5 or 10 square feet of a Class B fire fueled by flammable or combustible liquids or flammable gas (LPG)) and Class C energized 120v electrical. These extinguishers pack easily and can loose air over time."
I might have been a lot better off with a BC, which woudln't hurt me or my food. I haven't turned the oven on since I used the ABC, but it was clearly hot when I sprayed it in the first place. None of this would matter if it werent' a continuous cleaing oven.
Still, an awful lot of fires are class A, common combustibles, paper, fiberglass, wood,
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Call your local fire department and see who they use.
Hank
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With dry chem extinguishers, it's often cheaper to go buy a new one. Sadly, so. The one extinguisher guy I talked with for awhile, Mike. I noticed on one of his official papers on the wall, his full name is Muhammed. Which is fine with me. Looked like he knew what he was doing.
I'm like you, hate to throw out something that can be reused.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Probably trained in Waziristan.
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To his credit, he was only trying to blow up extinguishers to the rated pressure.
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On Fri, 5 Feb 2010 16:22:58 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

But if was trying to blow them ALL up to that pressure, wouldnt' that be extremist?
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