It's for the children

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I remember from a few years ago, the reason why Californicate doesn't have enough power, is account of over regulation. Regulating the prices of power, and the construction of power plants. The answer to the problems of over regulation is.... more regulation. Not!
I am so..... glad I don't live in Californicate.
--

Christopher A. Young
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>I\'d choose to live without my AC over the others. Look at it this way
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Wrong. The California energy crisis of a few years ago was directly the result of deregulation, not over-regulation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_electricity_crisis

So are we.
-Frank
--
Here\'s some of my work:
http://www.franksknives.com /
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Actually it was the result of the regulations that brought about what is laughingly called "deregulation". The regulations that required the integrated utilities to "sell off" their generation then freeing prices while freezing rates (sorta like what happened with S&L crisis) brought about most of the problems, even according to wikipedia. That and deciding the feds would take on a task (regulation) that they were not set-up to do and may not even have had authorization lead to what we got.
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As I remember, they kept the price caps on the price the utility could charge. I would not, in my wildest dreams call that deregulation.
--
Christopher A. Young
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As memory serves, they deregulated the wholesale, while keeping price caps. So, there was no profit in generating electric. It was not really deregulated, since they limited the retail price companies could charge.
--
Christopher A. Young
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I'm the author of the American Thinker article. I also commented on the EnergyPulse article - it got me digging on the issue.
There are definitely differences in viewpoints. I based my article on the direct words of the California Energy Commission's proposed revisions and linked those documents in my article. I even quoted them. The authors of the EnergyPulse article hope to sell programmable communicating thermostats and supporting equipment. I want to build new nuclear power plants and set my own damn thermostat.
The state is trying to take control of your thermostat according to the plain words of the proposed Title 24. See page 63 in particular. The rules on who and when the override features are activated have yet to be decided. The supposition is that the local utility will actually push the button but in most cases, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), the state agency that runs the grid, will give the order. They already are in charge of rolling blackouts, etc. What exactly is an "emergency" in this context?
My political basis is that the state of California has made it very difficult to build new, effective generation in the state. They "fix" this government-made problem by taking control of your personal property when they want to. The proper solution, in my opinion, is to build several new nuclear power plants. The billions we've spent on wind and solar hasn't and won't help.
The choice is not loss of control of your thermostat versus blackouts. The choice is nuclear power plants versus continued loss of freedom and further invasion of one's life by the state.
Ultimately, PCTs will be used to implement real time pricing. There are lots of arguments pro and con on this. Anyone want to bet that an average home's electric bill will DECREASE under real time pricing without radical reorganization of one's family life and habits?
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snipped-for-privacy@gene.ge.com wrote:

Law I in politics is "tax the few, benefit the many."
In California, it's "regulate the many, benefit the loudest."
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HeyBub wrote:

To me, it is ignore the silent majority, pleaae the loud minority Silent majority should rise up and take their place.
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Let me see if I got this straight...
You're thinking that I should be upset that any entity outside my domicile should want to exercise control over the largest energy consuming device in my home. There is a certain "cold dead finger" feel to the issue. I'm certain that had then been electric powered air conditioners available to our original framers they would have felt it necessary to protect them in the bill of rights, much the same manner that operating a motor vehicle and separation of corporation and state would have been - if they'd only known.
Of course, they* could just cut the power off completely and I'd pretty much be screwed, so I guess if I wanna continue to suckle on the nanny-state's gridded teat I'll comply with their totalitarian demands. Oh, wait - dang! I've got thumbs - I'll just grow my own electricity, there aren't even emission controls regulations on the small displacement engines that I might choose to use - that'll show 'em! I'll spew as much as I damn well please and they can't stop me, Baa haa ha.
*assuming some sort of collusion between the now deregulated, completely privatized electricity providers and the democratically elected republicans that do my biding in the government as you have alluded to.
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