is venting your dryer to the house O.K in winter?

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10 WO=.0025'outdoor humidity ratio (Phila in January) 20 TRp'room temp (F) 30 CFM=.7*2400*8/60'airflow through house (cfm) 40 W'pounds of water per load 50 FOR H=2 TO 12 STEP 2'drying time (hours) 60 P=W/H'water vapor supply rate (lb/h) 70 WI=WO+P/(60*CFM*.075)'indoor humidity ratio 80 PA).921/(1+.62198/WI)'vapor pressure of room air ("Hg) 90 PS=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+TR))'vapor pressure at Tr and 100% RH ("Hg) 100 RH0*PA/PS'relative humidity in house (%) 110 PRINT H,RH 120 NEXT H
Time (H) RH (%)
2 53.60285 4 34.89333 6 28.61733 8 25.47186 10 23.58219 12 22.32141
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Are you sure? I looked at a site that said the average dryer load evaporates out 5 pints of water (and a pint being a pound, the world 'round, that's be 5 lbs of water).
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No. It's been a while since I checked this. IIRC, before the spin, a 1 pound towel might weigh 3 pounds...

OK.
10 WO=.0025'outdoor humidity ratio 20 TRp'room temp (F) 30 CFM=.7*2400*8/60'airflow through house (cfm) 40 W=5'pounds of water per load 50 FOR H=1 TO 4 STEP 1'drying time (hours) 60 P=W/H'water vapor supply rate (lb/h) 70 WI=WO+P/(60*CFM*.075)'indoor humidity ratio 80 PA).921/(1+.62198/WI)'vapor pressure of room air ("Hg) 90 PS=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+TR))'vapor pressure at Tr and 100% RH ("Hg) 100 RH0*PA/PS'relative humidity in house (%) 110 PRINT H,P,RH 120 NEXT H
Time (H) lb/h RH (%)
1 5 47.386 2 2.5 31.75781 3 1.666667 26.5209 4 1.25 23.89726
Nick
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One DOE site lists "Remaining Moisture Content" standards after spins...
warm spin cold spin
15 min 4 min 15 min 4 min
100 Gs ~45% ... 50% ... 500 Gs 24% ... 30%
So a 12 lb load might weigh 18 after a low speed spin...
Nick
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It is okay to vent your dryer in house there are special lint filters to attach . This was tried years ago as an method to save vented heat.
Rey
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In two houses I used to own, I experimented with venting an electric dryer into the house. I did this in the winter, in climates that had snow.
In one case I probably got away with it, due to the size of the house and its very old age. It leaked air like a sieve. Consequently, the air changed frequently and the vapor likely didn't collect anywhere. My only problem was lint.
In the second case, the house was 1,000 square feet, and new and therefore well sealed (mostly). I had a family of rout. This was a complete failure. The dryer ran very long, since the incoming air to the dryer was very moist. I had visible moisture in the air after two loads of laundry, heavy condensation on the dual-pane windows, etc. There was a build-up of ice on the insulation that covered the attic access. This was in a high-altitude and very dry climate. I conclude that you can destroy your house by rotting it, if you have too much moisture for the size of the house.
Moisturizing your house by using the dryer might work, but you may be putting large amounts of moisture into the air in a very short length of time, saturating the air and causing the problems listed above. Maybe if you do one load on any given day, have a very small family, large or leaky house, etc., you could get away with it.
If I find myself in a cold climate again, I would pursue a heat exchanger instead of indoor venting.
As for the gas dryer/monoxide problem: I've never had a gas dryer, nor a gas room heater of the non-vented type. I would like someone to read their owner's manual for a non-vented gas-fired room heater, and let us know the warnings associated with it. While CO might not be a problem for a properly working heater, I have to assume that there is either a buildup of combustion products in the room, or the instructions tell you to crack a window or something. To my logic, it seems impossible that you could run a heater indefinitely, in a cold climate, in a well-sealed house, and not expect problems.
IF these assumptions are not correct, would some knowledgable person please reply with an explanation (as opposed to the useless RS-type responses that make statements with no support).
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.

Lying, as always. Pity about the unvented natural gas room heaters.
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OK, in just this thread, here are RS's complete contributions. Please note that there is essentially NO information added, no data, no anything of use. Disagreements galore, with no supporting statements. Mostly just simple retorts, one-line insults, and ad-hominem attacks. Ignore this dude. I feel sorry for him, but let's ignore him. (after this post, of course 8<P
------------------------------------------------
Nope.
You can be certain it wont be producing CO, they dont go wrong like that.
Neither do unvented natural gas heaters either.
It doesnt work like that. You dont get people dying like that with unvented natural gas heaters.
Nope, just you.
In fact none of those are from unvented natural gas room heaters, which might just be why they are allowed.
Completely irrelevant to what was actually being discussed.
Not from unvented natural gas room heaters they dont.
Mindless pig ignorant silly stuff that doesnt explain why unvented natural gas room heaters work fine.
Mindless pig ignorant silly stuff that doesnt explain why unvented natural gas room heaters work fine.
General waffle. Pity about unvented natural gas room heaters.
But in practice that doesnt actually happen with unvented natural gas room heaters.
But in practice that doesnt actually happen with unvented natural gas room heaters.
Irrelevant to what is being discussed.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
In practice those that dont do that with unvented natural gas room heaters dont actually die like flys.
In practice those that do that with unvented natural gas room heaters dont actually die like flys.
Pity about the earlier 200 claim.
Pity about the fact that it doesnt happen with unvented natural gas room heaters.

Mindless pig ignorant silly stuff that doesnt explain why unvented natural gas room heaters work fine.
Your pathetic neurotic hangups are your problem.
Pity those circumstances dont occur in real life.
And you're welcome to add a CO sensor if you're that neurotic anyway.
Mindless pig ignorant waffle. Have fun explaining why its so rare with unvented natural gas room heaters.
Easy to claim. Hell of a lot harder to actually prove.
And it wouldnt happen with a dryer anyway, they have fans that most natural gas appliances dont.
Nope, the never was people DYING from the CO.
You, as always.
Wrong. Most of the time its nothing like proof.
Easy to claim. Hell of a lot harder to actually prove.
There's really only one way to prove that 'dustbunnies' claim, do some test with and without the 'dustbunnies' while measuring CO levels, and they didnt actually do that.
Wrong, as always. Those are AFTER the burner, stupid.
Dont believe it.
So it doesnt affect what the burner gets, stupid.
Wrong, as always.
Wrong as always when its the OUTPUT thats restricted.
Fraid not.
Lying, again.
Doesnt happen with a dryer.
Wrong again with a dryer that aint sealed or anything like it.
Wrong again with CO.
No need to ask if you are a pathetic excuse for a bullshit artist.
The answer is obvious.
Some gutless fuckwit desperately cowering behind
to bullsit its way out of its predicament and fooled absolutely no one at all, as always.
Dont burn anything at all, ever. I'm all electric thanks, child.
And its completely trivial to add a CO sensor if you're a neurotic too.
Not a shred of rocket science required at all.
Wrong.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Which burn much more gas than a drier does too.
Nope, those burnt coal gas, different animal entirely.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Because with unvented natural gas room heaters, its obviously not a risk or those would be banned. They arent. Because you silly little pig ignorant fantasy doesnt happen with them.
There is no code that bans unvented natural gas room heaters.
Thanks for that complete superfluous proof that you dont actually have a clue.
Bullshit when the codes first showed up.
And those that dont bother dont die like flys. Funny that.
Nope, nothing like.
And those that do that anyway dont die like flys.
Mainly because of the risk of fire while asleep.
Yep.
Dont need to test anything to realise that unvented natural gas room heaters violate no code.
Irrelevant to how many use unvented natural gas room heaters and who dont bother to test anything and survive fine.
Nope, FACT that unvented natural gas room heaters are perfectly legal and work fine.
That is just YOUR pig ignorant guess which happens to be just plain wrong.
Unvented natural gas room heaters violate no code.
Go and fuck yourself.
Not even possible for someone as stupid as you.
How many unvented room heaters have a CO detector that shuts off the heater when it gets too high ?
You're wrong, as always.
Useless analogy. We know that people get thrown around in car accidents and that seatbelts help dramatically.
You just dont get people dying of CO with unvented natural gas heaters.
Yes, with dying due to the CO.
No need when unvented natural gas heaters dont produce that result.
In practice the air consumption is so small that its not worth worrying about. Houses just arent that well sealed.
Its not necessary.
Just how many of you are there between those ears, Meehan ?
Been jumping at bogeymen long, child ?
Yep, just like I do with unvented natural gas heaters too.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Lying, as always. Pity about the unvented natural gas room heaters.
Nope.
Bullshit. Have fun explaining why non vented natural gas heaters dont.
Nope.
Nope, nothing like. The computers are controlling for something different, stupid.
If you're that neurotic, best use just electricity, stupid.
I'm not silly enough to give anyone who smokes the bums rush.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote

More of your pathological lying.
The FACT that the codes allow unvented natural gas room heaters PROVES that venting a dryer into the house is safe, fuckwit.
<reams of your pathological lying flushed where it belongs>

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Rod Speed wrote:

See? He can't help it. More attempted insults, obscenities, etc. And not one single piece of information for the group.
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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote

Lying, as always.
You cant actually be THAT thick, you must be a pathological liar.
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Rod Speed wrote:

If you had accurate information, you wouldn't need to resort to sixth grade schoolboy obscenities and other juvenile antics. Codes that allow unvented room heaters tell us nothing about clothes dryers. Unvented heaters are designed to be unvented; clothes dryers are not.
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Corse that silly little fuckwit didnt do anything like that itself, eh ?

Wrong. They do show that unvented natural gas room heaters are perfectly safe.

Pathetic, really.
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Rod Speed wrote: ..

Rod, being insulting is one thing, but using lack of logic to try and prove that something is safe when it is not is serious. Someone might take your foolishness as fact and could die as a result.
Please reconsider your tolling. Taking risks with other peoples' lives is not funny.
Your kind of games are the standard for adolescents who can't adjust to society. They don't realize that it is those actions that create their problems, not solve them.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
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Wrong, as always.

That statement that unvented natural gas room heaters are perfectly safe is fact, stupid.

Just another of your silly little pig ignorant fantasys.

Retake Bullshitting 101.

Pathetic, really.

You pathetic excuse for bullshit is the standard for terminal pig ignorant fuckwits.

Your pathetic excuse for bullshit in spades.
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wrote:

Hey Rod, I think you've got that "unvented natural gas room heater" stuck up your ass. It seems to be applying pressure to your brain. If somehow you can manage to remove it, maybe then you might realize the thread is about clothes dryers, not room heaters...
Besides, it would appear you have totally used up your vocabularly, you keep writing the same words, no matter what you are responding to. Try going back and completing the 4th grade, you'll be a happier man for it.
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Hey gutless, not a shred of evidence that you are actually capable of thought, or anything else at all, either.

Your pathetic little deviant fantasys are your problem, gutless.

Not a shred of evidence that you have anything other than ear to ear dog shit.

Pathetic, really. The FACT that unvented natural gas room heaters are perfectly safe PROVES that its perfectly safe to vent a clothes dryer into the house if you want to do that.
<reams of your puerile shit any 2 year old could leave for dead flushed where it belongs>
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wrote

Without adding more to the flame part...
I think Rod might be mis-informed.
Yes, its safe, to a point, to use a heater labeled unvented in a room, however, there are precautions even for this, as anyone that is in the heating trade can tell you. Even these units come with an O2 sensor that shuts the unit off in the event of an improper burn condition that could possibly kill you..
They are also designed to burn as clean as we know how to make them currently, and they still emit as a byproduct CO, CO2 and H2O. Two of the above CAN kill you as we all know. Ok..all three can, but its gonna take alot of water vapor from that NG, or LPG to get that much water.
A dryer, is a completely different animal. It is NOT designed to heat the home, it is NOT designed to burn as clean as a heater. The metering, burn location and heat exchanger, the entire design of it, it NOT to be vented into the home, as the warnings on the units state. More than once we have been called out on a CO detector call, to find that the dryer was unhooked from the vent, and someone was trying to use it for "free" heat.
A dryer burn system, is closer to a furnace than you might want to admit. Its the same reason that even a stove, in a kitchen, if its gas, must have a hood system that is vented outside.
While it sounds like a good idea, to some, the proof is simple. Get your hands on a CO detector, not the POS that is sold at Lowes and Home Depot, but a hand held, certified detector, like a FLuke..they run about $240 for a good one, and check the level of CO at your dryer vent....you will be surprised.
CO posioning isnt a joke, its real, and it happens over silly stuff....trying to run a furnace with a gas valve thats adjusted wrong, a crack in the heat exchanger....a dryer that the limit switch goes bad and allows the valve to fire all the time its running.....

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So it's time to tear down lots of existing houses? :-)
Nick
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wrote:

If that was the case, around some parts, they would have to tear down alot of places cause of homeowner installed furnaces too....lol
Code means..NOW..as in..if you build it now...today...sheesh.
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