is venting your dryer to the house O.K in winter?

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Some gutless fuckwit desperately cowering behind
to bullsit its way out of its predicament and fooled absolutely no one at all, as always.
Dont burn anything at all, ever. I'm all electric thanks, child.
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No. The crux of the matter isn't whether something COULD go wrong, it's whether something is LIKELY to go wrong. If the odds are 1 in a billion, then it's ignorable. If they're 1 in a million, then it's probably against code, but it's not what *I*d consider dangerous. If they're one in a thousand, than it's a dumb-ass idea.
(all relative to the expected gain, which is not all that large, to begin with)
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And its completely trivial to add a CO sensor if you're a neurotic too.
Not a shred of rocket science required at all.
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Yaaaa, and who knows, maybe your roof will malfunction and fall on you... After it happens it'll be too late to do anything....
For the only mildly paranoid, a CO detector will handle the contingencies.
Every winter I divert my dryer indoors through a homemade HEPA filter - several automotive air cleaners stacked on top of each other. The heat is useful, as is the humidity. Cheaper than running a humidifier all the time.
My dryer is in my large bathroom. I usually throw a load in to dry before I shower. It's nice to step out to a nice humid, warm room.
John
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wrote:

I hope it's an electric dryer. I want to get up there and try some of your BBQ

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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

True, but having your head bang into the dashboard in a car isn't an issue unless something goes wrong with traffic patterns. Does that mean we should eliminate seatbelts?
Or, to put it a different way, in what percentage of dryers of the combustion proper? Is it exactly 100% without any exceptions? If not, then given that there are millions and millios of dryers in use, it seems wise to have a safety measure in place.
By the way, personally I think there are TWO problems going on when you talk about a dryer venting its air outside during the winter. One is the loss of heat since hot air is going outside. But the other problem is that since the dryer is constantly pumping air outside, that air needs to be replaced and will be replaced by outside air that makes its way into the building wherever it can get in. In other words, running the dryer makes your house more drafty, because it creates a pressure differential between inside and outside.
This second problem could be minimized by opening up the laundry room to outside air so that the cold air can come in to the laundry room only, rather than the whole house. In my own case, I sometimes do this by opening the window in the laundry room slightly, although I realize very few laundry rooms have a window...
- Logan
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One problem with dryers burning gas completely is that they are designed to burn gas in regular air. When you vent the dryer into the house, you use up oxygen and introduce large amounts of carbon dioxide. Now the air that you are useng to burn the gas has a different makeup. More CO2 is in the air and less oxygen. So after venting the dryer into the house for a while, the complete combustion you started with becomes incomplete combustion. So you start producing CO as well as CO2. This is why furnaces and water heaters require flues to operate.
Gee, you could just disconnect your furnace from the chimney and it would be 100% efficient and humidify the house as well. People used to do that when gas water heaters first came out. Some people were OK, some got headaches, some got sick and some died. That is where the codes came from in the first place.
If you have a big house with high infiltration rates, and you don't use the dryer much, you will probably be OK. If you have a small, tight house and use the dryer a lot, you will probably get sick or die. With all the lawyers running around in this country, why risk it. If you survive, someone else may sue you over it. Why not just play it safe and follow the code? That is what the codes are for. To protect people (like you), even from themselves.
Stretch
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Because codes are written by peoplew with axes to grind.
Nick
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No, they are not written by people with axes to grind. They are writtien so that people don't hurt themselves.
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Wrong.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Which burn much more gas than a drier does too.

Nope, those burnt coal gas, different animal entirely.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.

Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.

Because with unvented natural gas room heaters, its obviously not a risk or those would be banned. They arent. Because you silly little pig ignorant fantasy doesnt happen with them.

There is no code that bans unvented natural gas room heaters.

Thanks for that complete superfluous proof that you dont actually have a clue.
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Wrong.
Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters.
Which burn much more gas than a drier does too.

Nope, those burnt coal gas, different animal entirely.
NO, they burned NATURAL gas, at least where I came from.
"Have fun explaining unvented natural gas room heaters. "
Instructions for unvented room heaters say to use them with a window partly open. That acts somewhat like a chimney. Same for kerosene heaters. The instructions for those also say NOT to use them while you are sleeping. (Wonder why???)
By the way, have you EVER owned or used combustion testing instruments? I notice that those who are the loudest in favor of violating codes, have never tested ANYTHING. I have used combustion test equipment many times on gas and oil burning furnaces and boilers. It is scary how many don't burn properly. Then you come along, with just an opinion and never having tested combustion, pontificating on how safe violating safety code is. go get a combustion tester and CO tester and use them on a regular basis. You will learn a thing or two.
Stretch
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Bullshit when the codes first showed up.

And those that dont bother dont die like flys. Funny that.

Nope, nothing like.

And those that do that anyway dont die like flys.

Mainly because of the risk of fire while asleep.

Yep.
Dont need to test anything to realise that unvented natural gas room heaters violate no code.

Irrelevant to how many use unvented natural gas room heaters and who dont bother to test anything and survive fine.

Nope, FACT that unvented natural gas room heaters are perfectly legal and work fine.

That is just YOUR pig ignorant guess which happens to be just plain wrong.

Unvented natural gas room heaters violate no code.

Go and fuck yourself.

Not even possible for someone as stupid as you.
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Rod Speed wrote:

How many dryers have a CO detector that shuts off the dryer when it gets too high??
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Joseph Meehan

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How many unvented room heaters have a CO detector that shuts off the heater when it gets too high ?
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Rod Speed wrote:

I believe most if not all of them do today.
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Joseph Meehan

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You're wrong, as always.
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Rod Speed wrote:

It appears I was wrong. Lawrence Wasserman provided the reason I was wrong. Now that he noted it, That is what I was referring to, I just had them mixed up.
In any case it appears you are more interested in proving someone wrong that in providing real useful information on the safety of the devices.
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As always.

Still wrong with the claim that most if not all of them have those too.

Still wrong with the claim that most if not all of them have those.

Just your usual pathetic excuse for bullshit that you always end up having to resort to when you get done like a dinner, as always.
And like I said, if you are a pathetic neurotic, you can always have a CO detector. They cost peanuts.
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Rod Speed wrote: ....

Say what you like about me, I really don't care, but please don't give poor advice that might end up killing someone.
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Joseph Meehan

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I will indeed.

You clearly do.

So stupid that it hasnt even noticed the hordes of unvented natural gas room heaters that kill no one at all.
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