is venting your dryer to the house O.K in winter?

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This reminds me of the National Mechanical Code, which is said to prohibit circulating conditioned air at more than 120 F in wooden stud spaces. I presume the excuse was the danger of fire, and the code committee creatures who wrote this sell fireproof materials.
A few of the few dozen wood solar attics in Soldiers Grove WI were lined with drywall after the state declared them "plenums," until pharmacist Don Stebbins refused to do so, saying the theoretical graph they were using for the time it takes wood to catch fire was in degrees C vs F, and the time scale was log vs linear. At this point the state creatures cravenly slunk away without reimbusing the injured parties. There have been no fires in 27 years.

Good thing the code creatures didn't see that part :-)
Nick
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You would not want to do that.
The humidity in your home would get to the point where surfaces would start sweating (condinsation)
However, there is nothing wrong with adding more vent pipe (inside your home) but still vent it outside. I would however use hard pipe,not flex. The flex pipe is not smooth enough on the inside and restricts airflow. Something like a large radiator.

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On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 19:52:57 GMT, "Merlin-7 KI4ILB"

Only if you were using the dryer all the time. The usual intermitant use of a home dryer would produce an amount of moisture that would be quickly absorbed by the rest of the house, just like when someone takes a shower without a bathroom vent.
But I would say that the main problem with indoor dryer venting is that it is next to impossible to filter out the lint. Even the commercial devices designed to do this are inadequate. Lint accumulation can be anything from a nuisance to a fire hazard.
-Robert Scott Ypsilanti, Michigan
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Pop,
I'm Sorry, I should have given the entire name. International Mechanical Code section of the International RESIDENTIAL building Code. The fact that you have found installations that violate current code is not surprising. The code is constantly changing, getting better. The code is there to PROTECT people and property. Also, people constantly violate codes, the same as people often commit crimes. Sometimes people get away with it. That dos not make it a good idea. Please note that not all inspectors are equal to the task.
Sometimes someone does something that damages property or hurts people that is not covered by code. The code bodies then look at updating code to cover new problems. The changes are not instant, but they do come. The international codes cover both residential and commercial installations. Obviously you did not do enough research. Buy a full copy of each book you wish to quote like I did. Your passages are taken out of context. I did not quote all passages and sections, because my copy is printed and I did not want to type that much.
Go read the whole thing. I quoted you chapter & verse, but I guess you just like to argue.
Stretch
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Please excuse the not cutting anything much, but the codes also say that a standard toggle switch, like a light switch, cannot serve as a electrical disconnect for a furnace. Do that and you won't pass the inspection....

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Wow. Can we install the damper backwards, after an open T in the house?
And if the guy who dries his clothes by the woodstove loosely stacked in laundry baskets were to bring his electric dryer back out of the rain into the house and put it near the woodstove and stack the clothes loosely inside, with no power applied, would he have to comply with section 504.4?
What if he turned on the tumbler motor without the electric heating elements?
Or put his clothes in a closet with a $12 heater and a humidistat?
Do the International Mechanical Code police often visit houses?
Are they something like The Spanish Inquisition?
Nick
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Pop wrote:

You're telling me I can obtain a residential clothes dryer from Sears that is configured by the manufacturer (or with a factory-made accessory) to vent the gas exhaust separately from the "other" exhaust?
I want one. Model number please. All I could find was dryers which allowed a choice of where to run the single exhaust pipe (back, side, bottom).
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I've worked on commercial laundry equipment. I've never seen any that vent separately...
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How do they ensure that the drying air doesn't backdraft the combustion air?
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Fact is, there's no proof is doesn't backdraft through the non-working equipment. Air follows the path of least resistance, like the breeze through Nicks skull. commercial places I used to work at kept the doors open nearly year around...

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Pawel wrote:

First, do not consider this for a gas dryer. Second I don't suggest it for an electric due to problems that have been reported, including: too much interior moister build up, dust - lint, odor, reduced dryer efficiency due to clogged filters or recycling moist air back to the dryer.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

This question comes up often and one of the answers is *NO* if it's a gas dryer. Gas ovens/stove tops 'vent' into the house. What's the difference in the fumes from 3 hours of turkey roasting or some time drying clothes with each appliance venting into the house? I know the turkey smells better... Fumes is Fumes. Bake a cake for for an hour (or whatever) or dry clothes for an hour? I'm not saying that venting the gas fired dryer into the house is a good thing, I just want to understand the rational of those who say don't do it. Thanks.
--
Steve
southiowa
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I've noticed the clothes will dry faster on less humid days than when it is raining. So I suppose if you were to vent the dryer into the house, the dryer intake air would be very humid and the dryer would have a difficult time drying the clothes.
Basically you would be recirculating the moisture; out the dryer, then back in again.
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That's true outdoors, especially when it is raining :-)

I don't think so.

The drying rate should be proportional to the difference between the vapor pressure at 100% RH at the dryer temp, say 130 F with Ps = 4.53" Hg, and the vapor pressure of house air, eg Pa = 0.299 for 70 F at 40% RH or 0.449 at 60% or 0.748 at 100%, which is much smaller, so the house RH should make little difference in drying time. Clothes that dry in 20 minutes at 40% RH with Ps-Pa = 4.23 might dry in 20x4.23/(4.53-0.449) = 21 minutes at 60%.
OTOH, they might dry in 20x4.23/(0.748-0.299) = 188 minutes (3.1 hours) in 70 F air at 40% RH and 20x4.23/(0.748-0.449) = 283 minutes (4.7 hours) in 70 F air at 60% RH, with the help of a fan. At 100%, they would never dry, theoretically-speaking.
They might dry in 2 hours (120 minutes) in a house with 70 F air at 60% RH if 120 = 20x4.23/(Ps-0.449), so Ps = 1.204 "Hg = e^(17.863-9621/(460+T)), which makes T = 84 F, with a Holmes HFH111 1500W compact heater fan ($12.88 at Wal-Mart) set to 84 F in a closet, in series with a humidistat that turns it off when the closet RH drops to 60%.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

and the byproducts of combustion.
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Al Bundy wrote:

I had a natural gas dryer and vented inside the home. We installed a box with a flap in it to direct the exhaust outdoors or indoors. The indoors hole had a fine lint filter (similar to a nylon stocking), there was no lint coming out. I don't think there are any significant byproducts of natural gas combustion. There certainly was no odors or anything. I mean, it should be the same as a natural gas stove/range, and those are obviously not vented.
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That is essentially the main point.
Damp, dusty lukewarm air is a commodity that you really don't want inside your house. That's why it is traditionally vented outside the house. Some people have tried heat recovery products, but think about it... How many hours does your dryer operate each week. Probably not too many.
If it is a gas dryer, venting it indoors could kill you. The products of combustion are CO (Carbon Monoxide) and CO2 (Carbon Dioxide). The first is a deadly poison caused by inefficient combustion (not enough Oxygen). Carbon Dioxide can also kill you if there are large quantities. Although not a poisonous gas, people have died because their was too much CO2 in the house, displacing the Oxygen which is essential to respiration. (See the Movie Apollo 13 for more info).
Beachcomber
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We routinely vent our electric dryer into the house when it's cool and the humidity is low. It runs through a plastic box ($10 @ HD) half-filled with water to trap the lint
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Nonsense! The byproducts of proper gas combustion is CO2 and water vapor. CO is not an issue unless something is wrong with the dryer.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 22:38:41 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

Isn't that the point? You can't be certain something won't go wrong with the dryer and it might end up being too late by the time you find that out, or your heirs find out...

DJ
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