Is tinted primer + one coat of paint enough for repainting walls?

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Doug Miller wrote:

Primers have a lot less hiding power than paint. Why would you prime and paint when two coats of paint would cover better?
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Right.
Tinting primer only makes sense when covering, or going to, a very deep color from or to a light color.
Why would one create tinted primers fer ever' color they're gonna paint - how can that save much $$$?
Methinks the original poster is in danger of outsmarting himself.
Banty
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Which is *exactly* the situation the OP described...
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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says...

Eh - the dark orange to cream, yes. The others, nah. *Maybe* the lime green to cream, if the lime green is very deep, but most of the time it's not .... White to baby blue? C'mon.
He only needs one tinted primer. Frankly, I'd just go with the two coats paint.
Banty
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You're missing the point. Two finish coats is a given anyway. The question is one coat of tinted blocking primer plus two finish coats, vs. three finish coats.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I don't know if it's automatically a three coat job. Two finish coats should cover. If it's not, either the paint is a low solids cheapo brand or it's being put on too thinly.
There are other reasons to omit the primer entirely. Leftover tinted primer is pretty much useless, whereas leftover finish paint is very useful. There's also the Murphy's Law factor - you'll either have too much leftover primer _and_ finish paint left over, or you'll run short. The first case gives the OP inventory - not really a benefit, and the second case costs her more for the expensive finish paint. The most economical way to maximize the materials cost is to use the same color finish paint on two coats for the three rooms and skip the primer.
R
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Doug Miller wrote:

Primer is a waste in this situation. Two coats of paint cover most colors. Three for drasticly different colors. If three coats of paint are needed to cover a color, then three it is. Primer doesn't cover.
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Are you missing the word "blocking" in the phrase "blocking primer" accidentally or intentionally?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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clipped

A blocking primer, as I understand it, keeps stains and some wood pigments from bleeding through into the PAINT coating. Has nothing at all to do with whether the paint that goes on after it COVERS the underlying color. Entirely different issues.
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Norminn wrote:

Most stain blocking primers don't mention their hiding ability as they're primarily sealers and don't hide all that well. http://www.benjaminmoore.com/wrapper_pg2art.asp?L=info&K=pr&N=press&art=7.4.2.26 There are a few stain blocking primers that have improved hiding ability. Zinsser makes two - High Hide and Deep Tint (although this one relies on added colorant to improve the hide). http://www.zinsser.com/subcat.asp?CategoryID=1
R
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Yes, and it also is better at hiding hard-to-cover colors such as the vivid orange and lime green that the OP described.

Not correct.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Not sure if anyone still cares, but quick update: I went ahead and bought Benjamin Moore's top-line eggshell paint. I primed the orange walls using BM's stain-blocking primer, but painted straight over the white walls in the bedroom.
In both rooms, the first coat of paint covered so well that I didn't end up painting a second coat. Of course, like I mentioned, (1) I don't get much natural light in either room, and (2) I wasn't too picky about my own workmanship, so it might actually be a shoddier paint job than I think. Still, I'm mostly happy with the results (the blue didn't turn out to be the exact same shade I had in my mind, but it's acceptable).
In any case, I'm definitely a fan of Benjamin Moore now; although this is the only paint I've used so far, it seems very good paint for sloppy novices like me to work with - easy to put on, quick-drying, great coverage, tolerable smell, and fairly easy to wash off of skin and hardwood floors.
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