is this something wonky with newly installed conrete floor ?

So my GC/Builder poured our basement floor and garage floor.
So i asked about cutting one crack relief groove between a smallish 8 x 10 extension tongue off main garage floor for a shop/storage area.
I figured that 8x10 tongue would eventually be source of a crack so I wanted to control where crack would go ... so cut a crack guide groove .
1st - is that sound logic ?
2nd - Is this next part WONKY ?
I go to check out the progress and i find that alot more grooves than i asked for have been cut ??
There a big cross ( + ) cut on the main garage floor
There is a huge lattice # (or two big connected crosses ++) cut into the basement floor ? didn't ask for any of those so i guess the GC/builder took it upon themselves to do.
Is that wonky, good, bad, useless etc, ideas , thoughts and experiences welcomed ???
Thanks, robb
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On Friday, December 19, 2014 8:34:35 AM UTC-5, robb wrote:

Yes, IDK how many feet apart they are supposed to be, but they are important so that the concrete can move at the control joint, instead of cracking randomly.

You definitely want them to break up large spans. I'd say about every 10ft or so, from what I see around here. I have a stamped concrete patio, where they cut control joints, but only to break up the long side. The shorter side, which is still probably ~15ft, they didn't cut in that direction. 15 years later, it's cracked, the run in the other direction with the cuts every 10 ft or so, is fine.
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"trader_4" wrote in message ---
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On 12/19/2014 9:35 AM, robb wrote: ...

...
Generally basements slabs are left smooth as a (did I say general :) ) rule as the hairline cracking isn't normally much of an issue given lack of real loading such as the garage slab. Can't hurt but depending on whether there's to be floor covering or not, may have to fill or do something else to prevent show-thru for that. All depends on what's going to happen to it in the end...
For the garage slab oftentimes they'll not there either, but it's _a_good_thing_ (tm) there to help avoid larger movement later as the higher expected point loads from the vehicles raise far more concentrated stress patterns.
In the house I bought (speculation-built, not custom), they didn't adequately pack the fill under the basement slab as it was built on a hillside w/ the garage entry door on the uphill side and the whole slab settled as much as 8" tilted to the back side and was still some 6" air gap under it. Had to shore up the rear supporting wall and use the pressure-injection fill to bring it back up eventually. Fortunately, they poured a thick-enough slab it didn't crack up terribly bad but did have some pretty good breaks. In the end after a brush-in of dry cement after patching the larger it didn't look half bad when we sold the place. I saw it just two years ago on a visit and it's still about as was then. Point is, cosmetic cracking is just that and isn't too much to be concerned over.
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"dpb" wrote in message ---
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Sounds like this GC is a keeper.
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On 12/19/2014 07:34 AM, robb wrote:

Huge lattice is probably good. I certainly have seen random cracking where only a very shallow groove has been scored.

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