Is this floor weak?

I went to watch a rock band at an old bar last night. The building is actually 3 separate old buildings that have been joined. The bar is one section along with a dining area. The band stage in the small part of the building and in between is the 3rd part which is a dance floor. That part is 19 feet wide (I counted the ceiling tiles). By the way it's built, the floor joists run across the 19 feet span. There were about 30 people on the dance floor, with all but about 5 dancing. That floor was bouncing and bowing 3 to 4 inches as people danced, and it's already low in the middle. At one point I walked in there and was standing against the wall watching the band. I was standing right at the support wall, and I could feel my back (against the wall), sliding up and down at least a half inch). If you ask me, this floor is extremely weak. Even if it's just framed with 2x8's there should not be that much bounce. 30 people, with each weighing 200 lbs is only 3 tons. I know that dancing in rhythm can and has caused decks to collapse. I fear this floor could collapse as weak as it feels. This building has been used as a bar for years, but was not a rock venue until about 6 months ago. At that time they renovated the interior as new owners took over. I tend to wonder if some structural supports were removed in the basement?
I am not sure who to report this to. I know telling the bartender would be worthless, maybe the building inspectors in town should be contacted? I'm not sure, but I have a gut feeling to tell someone before people are hurt of worst.
And, because I know someone will ask how drunk I was. The answer to that is I DO NOT drink. But I like going to see live music.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 10, 5:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I'd notify both the bar management and the local building inspector immediately. If you want to remain annonymous, just send them both a letter. That should do it. That much deflection is definitely not normal and it sounds like a serious safety issue where people could get killed.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 07:51:57 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

What he said.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/10/2011 5:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Did you happen to be in Allentown, PA at the Sterling Hotel?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 15:42:06 -0400, Tony Miklos wrote:

And next weak it will be roof weak!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 10, 5:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

The next time you find yourself in a similar situation, call 9-1-1 from the nearest phone and summon the fire department...
The fire department is empowered to assess the safety of all structures in their jurisdiction and order them closed until a detailed engineering study indicates the building is once again safe for occupation...
BTW: Fire Departments like being called in BEFORE a structure collapses, because BEFORE a collapse there are no injuries and no unsafe and unstable conditions from which victims must be rescued...
A floor in any type of building should not be deflecting by 3 to 4 inches that is indicative of undersized, unsupported or failing structure...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.