Is this baby snake coiled up outside a gopher snake or a rattler?

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Even heard of the 7 P's? Ever do any risk / reward ... cost / benefit analysis?
imo the potential cost for a bumbling rookie to handle a poisonous snake? vs the benefit?
If you live in snake country and knew nothing about snakes maybe an alternative plan was in order?
Next crisis? Brush fire? Got a fire plan? Equipment? Knowledge?
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On Wed, 05 Jun 2013 17:17:01 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

That's why I was clearing out and chipping the brush within 100 feet of the house. It's all part of the fire safe plan (which you have in your area also).
And, it's why I keep bolt cutters handy (to cut the chains on the fire access roads), and fire extinguishers in handy locations.
And, why we all have wharf hydrants, by code, on our properties, since we're all on well water.
And, why the town drops off those blue reflector things for us to put in the driveway or roadway for the fire department to locate our hydrants.
And, why the kids and grandkids know to assemble at the pool if/when there is a fire.
What else would you suggest?
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On Thu, 06 Jun 2013 13:44:47 -0700, Oren wrote:

That wouldn't be a bad idea because we're in the highest fire hazard zone they make.
I did toy with the idea of buying a pump for spraying the house from the pool, but then I realized it would be about a thousand bucks in toto, and would likely not be used because if the fire gets that close, I'm outta' here anyway.
Plus, the fire department is only about 25 miles away, yet they still made us pay that extra fire tax which isn't called a tax. It's called a fee. So that way they could get around the laws that make voting in California on tax raises harder. With a fee, it was easy because they told everyone they wouldn't be paying that "fee" so everyone voted since they want everyone else to pay their fee. I'm still burning up over it.
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 13:43:43 -0700, Oren wrote:

It would scare the daylights out of any kid!
Turns out, two of my neighbors spent time in the hospital recently due to snake bites, both reputedly from Northern Pacific Rattlers (which are apparently the only rattler that frequents these hills).
I spoke to both by phone this week because they had written back on our neighborhood alias that the snake was the same species that bit them.
So, within two miles of my house, two people in the past four years have been bitten by rattlers; and that's just the ones who responded within the neighborhood alias.
Wow. It's more prevalent than I had thought. Always a lesson to be learned.
PS: Maybe I flushed him out when I cleaned up all the animal dens when I cleared out the brush just fifty feet away from where he was found?
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 16:22:22 -0700, Oren wrote:

Understood.
Apparently the Northern Pacific rattler is an ambush predator, where the young predate on lizards while the adults enjoy the mammals and quail (of which I have plenty of bunnies, rats/mice, and assorted gophers for them to dine upon).
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On Sun, 02 Jun 2013 20:56:26 +0000, Danny D wrote:

They identified it as a young Northern Pacific Rattlesnake by numerous PhDs in the field. All concurred.

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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 16:12:42 +0000, Danny D wrote:

Here's a better description based only on the photo:
Andrew Gluesenkamp, Ph.D. You can tell that it is a rattler (Northern Pacific rattlesnake) by the head shape ("chunky" with steep vertical surfaces);dark/light band through the eye; stout body; pronounced, keeled scales that are not shiny; and dorsal color pattern made up of dark-margined blotches on a lighter background. These snakes are essentially sit-and-wait predators that seek out good places to ambush prey (fallen trees, rock ledges, walls, etc).
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 09:27:51 -0700, Oren wrote:

I think my little baby northern pacific rattlesnake was only interested in getting away from me. Sort of like what Bob is always trying to do! :)
BTW, here's another article on relocation; this one doesn't paint such a bright prospect, but, I think most people think of relocation as greater than 500 yards. http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2009/08/how-far-should-you-move-nuisance-rattlesnake-great-basin-inquiring-minds-want-know4413
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 12:28:12 -0700, Oren wrote:

Well, I don't know the age. Babies are apparently born in October, so, it was at least 6 months old. I "assumed" it was a juvenile based on the tiny rattle; but I could (easily) be wrong.
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 20:14:25 -0700, Oren wrote:

I know. They add buttons when they molt, which can be multiple times per year; and, more importantly, they lose 'em from time to time.
Anyway, it wasn't all that big.
I didn't bother to measure it, but let's say it was only about 15 inches to 20-something inches, and only about an inch thick or so (again, I didn't even attempt to measure it).
I've seen muuuuch larger ones out here; so, I still *think* it was young; but I really have no clue so I probably shouldn't have called it a 'baby'. Juvenile might be more appropriate - or - a skinny short adult. :) Let's hope it doesn't remember from whence it came!
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On Sunday, June 2, 2013 1:56:26 PM UTC-7, Danny D wrote:

it is a rattler you can tell by its eyes,tail, and its pattern
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On Sunday, June 2, 2013 1:56:26 PM UTC-7, Danny D wrote:

its a rattler
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On Sunday, 2 June 2013 15:56:26 UTC-5, Danny D wrote:

You shouldn't hurt a rattlesnake either! They are a protected species
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Oren wrote:

Heh heh ... I recently ran into this baby rattler down in my ravine.
http://i43.tinypic.com/1038v2w.gif
I counted about 7 rattles.
I wonder if it's the same one, perhaps grown up a bit, that I had ungracefully relocated a while back?
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On Fri, 13 Sep 2013 08:51:34 -0700, Oren wrote:

The rattler didn't seem perturbed one bit by my presence. Maybe he remembers?
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2013 20:09:37 -0700, Oren wrote:

As Oren says, at least in California, where even every tree is a protected species if it's greater than a foot in diameter at chest level, Rattlesnakes aren't protected.
I see a rattler every week or so.
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