Is there some kind of liquid coating I can apply as window UV filter?

Greetings all!
My wife have some huge single-pane south-facing (and in southern California, USA, Northern hemisphere, that means "towards the sun") windows that will most definitely get replaced when we replace all the energy innefficient windows in our house in a couple years. We are stalling on that project because it will be very pricey, I am sure.
We do have curtains to prevent the light from fading furniture, but I'd also like to coat these windows with something to help block out the UVA/UVB rays (not sure of the difference) when the curtains are open. I know there is film material you can cut and apply, but I feel our circumstances (huge oddly shaped windows) might make that a difficult project to accomplish satisfactorily. I was wondering if there were any "paint on" type of liquid which dries sort of clear and smooth and yet provides a coating which blocks some rays. I would prefer to do this myself rather than have a professional do it. This windows will probably be ripped out in the not terribly distant future, so I don't want to spend tons of cash on them.
As always, I am certain that I am imagining the existence of a miracle product that does not exist, but if it does exist, please let me know!
Chuck
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Sun screens can go up to 95% shade. They help a bunch with radiant heat as well. Me thinks you miracle coating is just that.
I have dual pane windows in Phoenix AZ. When the summer sun hits them there is nothing like sun screens to cut the heat and light.
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SQLit wrote:

Regular window glass blocks most UV light, it is IR that it does not block well and the new low-e glass does a better job at blocking.
Note as someone who has lived through over a dozen malignant melanomas over the last 35+ years, I suggest that even the remain 10% or so can do damage, just not as fast. Furniture damage in one thing, but that can be repaired or replaced. People are different. Even 95% is not good enough from me any more. Yea I still go out in the sun with sun block, but I am selective about it.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I here ya Joe....I'm Irish too and live in Florida....I really hate those trips to the dermatologist....that darned freeze can....not to mention the knife and going after "the margins"....Thank God for sunscreen, though it showed up a bit late for my generation......Ross
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call a window tinting company.
mike.........
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Here is a source for plastic film to stick to the inside of the glass which allegedly will help with your problem: http://www.improvementscatalog.com/product.asp?product "8402zz&dept%5Fid230
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Google "Gila Film" for information. It's similar to the film used to tint car windows but made in various widths and tints for house windows. Mine has endured 30 years. Available at big-box hardwares here in the southwest. You squeegee it on being careful to squeeze out any air bubbles. Much cheaper than shade screen. --- SJF
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On 27 Feb 2005 12:02:35 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Only liquid coating I know of is paint.
Might try a film, I've had some success with gila, but very limited used. So don't take my word for it, since I'm not a big customer.
http://www.chopurl.com?661
hth,
tom
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