Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?

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I've presented this before and was guided to check out the baseboard
heating register.  No leaks.  So the pin hole I guess is below the
hardwood floorboards and most likely the sub-floor beneath that. There
is a finished sheet rock ceiling in the room below with no leak
showing anywhere.

I'm hoping there is something like motor-magic that can be fed into
the hot water heating system which would find its way to the leak.

Anyone have any good ideas???   Thanks

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
On Apr 16, 8:17 pm, r.mario...@fdcx.net wrote:
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So...how do you know there is a leak if you don't see it in the room
below?

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
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open sheet rock cieling and inspect line. leak might be caused by
anything. its best to open it up and take a look....

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
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It's not that big of a deal to cut a hole in sheetrock, fix
the leak, then repair the ceiling.  If you try to use some
leak-stop product, how about if it works for 6 months,
then it fails with a real flood instead of a drip?

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
4ax.com:

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Find a copper pipe that fits inside the broken one?
It will reduce the capacity a bit, but you need only access to
both ends.

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?

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 Never heard of boiler sealer? Irontite Ceramic Sealer comes to mind.
Was used a lot in iron piping - and I've used it to stop up a bad head
gasket on a junker, as well as a cracked engine block. The stuff is
durable.

SealTyte is another brand.

 Not sure if the pipes will be hot enough to set the product.

PurePro makes 2 broducts -BoilerWeld and Hydronic Leak Seal. Boiler
weld comes in powder or liquid - you would want the liquid.

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
On Apr 17, 9:51 pm, cl...@snyder.on.ca wrote:
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the issue is this.....

OP really doesnt know what is leaking .......

and those stop leak products probably arent meant for drinking water

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
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OP could buy at harbor freight one of those cameras with lights that
go thru a hole to look around while ding minimal drywall damage. but
its probably not worth it.

or just forget about the leak till theres a flood and make a claim on
homeowners insurance. but thats really not how it should work.

as a friend used to say you cant make scrambled eggs without breaking
some eggs.

in this case some drywall must go

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
wrote:

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 He mentioned the baseboard heating register - by which I assume he
meant radiator - so I ASSumed he was talking the heating system.

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
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theres a possiblity the leak is from a drain line, or roof leak
following some line , or even condensation from a AC duct.

for the OPs safety the cieling should be opened for inspection.

otherwise one day a small drip might turn into a flood when no one is
home

Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
wrote:

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I've followed this thread for awhile and I know this was posted in the
past as well.  I really dont understand the whole thing.  OP says there
is a leak, yet cant see any wet areas on the sheetrock below.  Thus, how
does he know there is a leak?  I support the DIY method, but this sounds
like a call to the pros might be in order.  Cutting out a section of
sheetrock is not that big a deal, and it can be patched easy enough, but
I get the feeling this leak is all imaginary.  At no point does he state
that there is a *known* leak, or why a leak is suspected.  Seems he just
points a finger at that pipe, and says "that pipe must be leaking".  

Unless there is a known loss of water from this cooling system, or
obvious leakage that can be seen, then it seems that the leak does not
exist, and he is just imagining it.  At no time has he said any reason
to expect a leak.  He just claims there is a leak in that pipe, and yet
sees no staining or water dripping from the ceiling below.  This just
makes no sense to me.  

If I had reason to believe there was a leak and an indication of the
location of that leak, I'd cut out a small section of sheetrock and
check.  Heck, drill a 1/4" hole in the ceiling and see if water drips
out.  A dab of caulk can fix that tiny hole. Otherwise, call in the
pros, and let them investigate and inspect the system.  There are times
that the homeowner just cant take care of these things, and this OP dont
sound like the most knowledgable home repair guy.  

Using sealers made for auto radiators may or may not work.  They need
enough heat to seal a leak.  Then comes the question how does one get
the sealer into the system?  There is not radiator cap to remove.
Finally, using a sealer in a car coats the radiator and engine block,
which makes the cooling of the engine less effective.  I'd think that
such a product would make heating less effective as well, which would
result in wasted fuel, thus paying a higher fuel bill.  Not to mention
that if this stuff coated the pipes, this could result in a very costly
replacement of the whole heating system.  

If there is some actual sign of leakage, call the pros.  If not, quit
worrying about something that dont exist.  Then again, if this leak is
only imaginary, but the OP continues to stress over it, an inspection by
the pros would be cheaper than a psychiatrist, and he would not do
something that might be harmful to the heating system and cost a lot
more later.  Even if they charge $100 an hour, I'm sure they could
inspect the system in an average size home in an hour or less.  Maybe
the'll even tweak the system to operate more efficiently, and save a few
bucks on the heat bill.  Spend the money and call the pros, because you
dont seem to understand this problem (of there is one).



Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:25:02 -0500, tangerine3@toyotamail.com wrote:

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In hot water heating systems, during the heating season, it is
entirely possible (and in fact common) for minor leaks to be "dry
leaks" which only show up as a mineral deposit at the site of the leak
because the warm water evaporates from the pipe before it turns into a
drip.

 Same thing happens if you have a minor seapage at a soldered joint or
a union on the outlet of your water heater.
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Re: Is there any way or product to seal a pinhole in an inaccessible 1/2" copper pipe?
r.mariotti@fdcx.net wrote:
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If your quest is really to mitigate the leak, here's what I'd do:

Option #1 - Re-route the plumbing with new materials.

Option #2 - Close off the problematic area.




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